garage ceiling insulation

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  #1  
Old 02-08-09, 01:32 PM
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garage ceiling insulation

I recently reinsulated my garage ceiling...My kitchen is above my garage and I have copper lines running thru my garage up to my kitchen...I used foam around the copper and R19 in between the joices..I Have not hang the drywall yet... My pipes have frozen twice this winter....( I have lived in the house for the past 16 years and never had frozen pipes before)...will the drywall provide the added insulation to keep the pipes from freezing or is there something else that i can do? Thanks
 
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  #2  
Old 02-08-09, 02:14 PM
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Hi Thomas. It sounds like your insulation is isolating your pipes from the heat above. Remove all of the insulation above the pipes and install as much as you can below.

And yes the sheetrock will help, as R-19 is fiberglass and air moves freely through it. You might consider some rigid insulation below the pipes to get a bit more R-value in less space.

If your insulation is Kraft faced and facing down, then you may have the vapor barrier in the wrong place, but that is a different issue and easily fixed. Let us know.

Bud
 
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Old 02-09-09, 03:02 PM
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My insulation is kraft faced....looking up from the garage the facingstaring back at you....is this correct?...Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 02-09-09, 03:57 PM
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In cold country, the vapor barrier should be on the warm side of the insulation. The kraft does act as a vapor retarder, not a full barrier, but can cause condensation. Sounds like your kraft is on the cold side. The easy fix is to defeat the air seal by slicing the kraft. I've had to do it a couple of time and simply removed a one inch strip about 10 inches long, every foot or so. That opens up the surface to the insulation and will allow moisture to flow. The sheetrock you are going to put over it will also allow any trapped moisture to pass through it.

Do as good a job as possible with your insulation as living space over a cold garage is a frequent problem.

You might also consider a removable panel so you can access that plumbing if needed.

gl
Bud
 
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Old 02-09-09, 05:11 PM
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Thanks..I will cut the paper likeyou suggested...Should I keep the foam copper insulation on or remove it?... Thanks again
 
  #6  
Old 02-09-09, 07:34 PM
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I would remove it. You really want the copper to have as much access to heat as possible. Keeping it insulated on one side and exposed to the heat on the other can be a challenge in a small space.

Bud
 
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