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Can I insulate an antique wooden door to my attic stairwell?


hollasboy's Avatar
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Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1

12-07-09, 11:44 AM   #1  
Can I insulate an antique wooden door to my attic stairwell?

Just bought a large brick house in Houston that was built in 1940. My project is to install insulation in the attic (blown-in cellulose fibers) above the 2nd floor ceiling.

My stairwell goes from the first floor to the second floor with a 180 degree landing halfway up, ending in the upstairs hallway. If you do another 180 turn in the upstairs hallway, there is a full-sized door (7 ft tall) to another stairwell and landing going into the spacious attic. So basically, the stairwell goes from the first floor all the way up past the second floor (stopping in the hallway) and into the 3rd floor/attic.

The 7 ft door to the attic stairwell is solid wood, but is not insulated. The inset panels of the door (there are 2 insets) are rather thin, so they have little or no insulating value. I hate to replace the door with a stock exterior door from the local big box stoor since there are 6 other matching doors in that hallway. The modern door designs would not match the older pattern.

Is there any way to insulate an old wooden door? I'm not worried about the appearance on the attic side of the door. I'm thinking about stapling or gluing some batts or foam panels to the backside of the door, leaving a hole for the doorknob, of course.

 
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drooplug's Avatar
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Join Date: Aug 2009
Posts: 4,940
NJ

12-07-09, 05:08 PM   #2  
I would use the foam over batts. The foam will have a higher R value per inch. Try to weatherstrip the door as well.

 
Volnix's Avatar
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Join Date: Nov 2009
Posts: 103
NV

12-12-09, 08:10 AM   #3  
Why do you want to insulate the door? Usually insulation is just in floors in attics. Is that a door or trap-door in the ceiling of the 2nd floor?
Anyway, if its an antique door then maybe stapling it and gluing it might make it worst so I would somehow glue the insulation with a removable way.
Maybe you could use some adhesive tape (2-side one) or something similar but be careful as air trapped between door and insulation might make the insulation less effective.
As far for the doorknob you can change it with one of those key-in-knob ones or second knob-lock thing which dont let any air through.
Good luck with your project!


Posted By: hollasboy Just bought a large brick house in Houston that was built in 1940. My project is to install insulation in the attic (blown-in cellulose fibers) above the 2nd floor ceiling.

My stairwell goes from the first floor to the second floor with a 180 degree landing halfway up, ending in the upstairs hallway. If you do another 180 turn in the upstairs hallway, there is a full-sized door (7 ft tall) to another stairwell and landing going into the spacious attic. So basically, the stairwell goes from the first floor all the way up past the second floor (stopping in the hallway) and into the 3rd floor/attic.

The 7 ft door to the attic stairwell is solid wood, but is not insulated. The inset panels of the door (there are 2 insets) are rather thin, so they have little or no insulating value. I hate to replace the door with a stock exterior door from the local big box stoor since there are 6 other matching doors in that hallway. The modern door designs would not match the older pattern.

Is there any way to insulate an old wooden door? I'm not worried about the appearance on the attic side of the door. I'm thinking about stapling or gluing some batts or foam panels to the backside of the door, leaving a hole for the doorknob, of course.

 
Wirepuller38's Avatar
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Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 6,190
TN

12-12-09, 08:31 AM   #4  
Insulate Door

I would cut a piece of 1/4 in. plywood the size of the door. Apply all the insulation you want to the plywood. Then attach the whole thing to the door with screws. You will need to avoid anything which will interfere with the opening and closing of the door.

 
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