Sound proofing... about time too...


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Old 12-13-09, 01:43 PM
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Angry Sound proofing... about time too...

Hi all!

I live in a flat in the city center and allthough very convinient for shopping etc there are some major drawbacks like noise.
I am not talking just a few incidents of loud music, there are shops around open all day and night and the people passing around tend to shout right underneath my flat (why they do that I just dont know ) and then are the cars and mopeds too.
So I am in the need of some serious sound proofing in order to get some good nights sleep from now on, but you guessed it, I am also in a budget so I might try to fix something up my self.
I had a look on various soundproofing techiques and also a bit on the physics of the sound transmission.
First thing that I would like to ask, is that is there such a thing as a "Decibelometer" so I can calculate just how much noise I have inside the flat from outside? If so, has anyone seen one of those in digital form where I can somehow determine the maximum values of noise during a day or a week?
And second of all, I just had a look on the forums and I saw something about ratings on soundproofing efficiency on different materials. Do you think that with that I can somehow calculate how much of the noise I can block out?
A lot of the noise is probably comming in from the windows, which might need to be replaced but some of the noise is also comming in from the walls. Which side do you think its best to place the soundproofing, outside or inside side of wall?
Thank you very much.
 
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Old 12-13-09, 02:21 PM
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http://www.decibel-meter.com/

You will be hard pressed to find a way to sound proof your place on a small budget. I was in a similar situation as you at one time and did some research. Soundproofing is not cheap.

I don't have much to recommend as to how you can sound proof, but I used to play a cd of crashing waves at a low volume when I went to bed. I found this provided a mild amount of relief. You can also try ear plugs.
 
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Old 12-13-09, 04:23 PM
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Last edited by hesaidshesaid; 12-13-09 at 06:36 PM.
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Old 12-13-09, 05:10 PM
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Hi volnix, in my other life, when I worked for a living, I had the opportunity to work in and around an anechoic chamber, or soundproof chamber. The primary soundproofing was fiberglass cones of all different sizes. The point is, whatever you do inside the walls or outside the building, will still leave large flat walls inside. By essentially covering them up with irregular shaped objects, you break up the sound energy and dissipate it in all directions. Egg cartons would be a very small version and very inexpensive.

Google sound proofing a room and anechoic chamber and perhaps some ideas will pop up.

Bud
 
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Old 12-13-09, 07:26 PM
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Doesn't he need sound damping? I think the egg crates will reduce reflected noise in his flat, not stop noise from coming in from the outside.
 
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Old 12-13-09, 08:08 PM
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You're probably correct about needing dampening, like heavily insulated walls, but what I'm trying to point to is the inside of the room. Example, I built a commercial building and reserved a space for my shop, 20x50 with a 16' ceiling, and concrete floor. Unbelievable the echo. A broom handle fell and hit the floor. It reverberated for almost 15 seconds. The guys drove me crazy playing with it. I have bad hearing, and this echo was making the space impossible for me. Well, we filled it with shelving, desks, pictures, and very quickly the echo went away. We were going to hang carpeting along two of the walls if necessary.

The point I am trying to make is to absorb the sound once it enters. The sound proof rooms take any sound and absorb it. Stand 5 feet away from another person and you can only hear them when they talk directly at you. Turn around and nothing, absolutely nothing. So with sound coming in through walls and windows, you would only hear the portion of the energy directed towards you, and that is a small portion of the sound you normally hear.

There are acoustical ceiling tiles that could be applied to walls and ceilings with a double sided foam tape. Unfortunately, it would take some experimenting to determine how well it would work.

Bud
 
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Old 12-14-09, 07:20 AM
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Look at window plugs. Typically windows leak much more than walls and floors for exterior noise.

Egg cartons has to be the #1 internet myth for sound isolation.
 
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Old 12-14-09, 08:44 AM
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Easy Ted. I guess I should have put LOL after the comment so everyone would know it was a tongue in cheek suggestion. It was intended to represent the irregular shapes needed to achieve dispersion of the sound energy. I have several links for true sound proofing, commercial products, but they are well out of the price range for the op. Unfortunately soundproofing cannot be achieved inexpensively, but improvements can be made.

Bud
 
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Old 12-17-09, 01:47 AM
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Sound insulation

It seems that there are many different reasons that cause unwanted sound in a room and I have seen a few techniques on how to reduce them.
The problem with rolled-up and carton tile-like materials that you stick to a wall is that they cannot be plastered or insulated so they might get damaged over the years if placed on the outside wall. They also dont look very nice but thats a personal matter I guess.
I had a look in about sound damping and sound insulation and there are few building techniques in order to reduce the sound. One of the simpler ones indicatively is a wood-wool slab directly placed next to the styrofoam insulation layer and then that plastered.
Anyway I was reading this book has several building techniques on how to reduce the sound in a room and it also explaines alot on the physics of the sound , so if anybody wants he can send me a PM and I can email you the book title.
 
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Old 12-17-09, 05:38 PM
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I have lived in the same conditions and got used to it. When I moved to the country the quiet kept me awake until I got used to it. Ear plugs will help.
 
 

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