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Waterproofing a garage?


Earthworm Jim's Avatar
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Join Date: Apr 2010
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04-30-10, 07:34 PM   #1  
Waterproofing a garage?

So, I have a spare garage I'd like to turn into a plant nursery, and, since it's made of wood, I thought I'd like to take steps to waterproof it. Also mold proof, since part of the roof has a moldy patch already, I asked a question about this in the roofing section if anyone cares to look at that also. Anyway, I was thinking I'd rent a paint sprayer from Home Depot and saturate the interior of the garage with a few coats of waterproof and/or moldproof paint, hopefully they proof against both, and then, I thought I'd layer the inside with clear plastic sheeting, taped on with waterproof tape. Is this a good approach to this problem, or does anyone have a better idea, considering I'm on a fairly limited budget?

Thanks,

Jim

 
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airman.1994's Avatar
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05-01-10, 06:34 PM   #2  
You will need to kill the mold first. Then you can spray a anti-micrbel paint. Have you got a paint yet?

 
Bud9051's Avatar
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05-02-10, 02:39 AM   #3  
Your location will affect the choices and waterproofing the inside of the walls and then covering the studs with plastic sounds like two vapor barriers. Is this a free standing garage or attached to the house? Will you be insulating any walls or ceiling and adding any heat?

Bud

 
drooplug's Avatar
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05-02-10, 05:53 AM   #4  
Spraying the inside structure with paint is not going to protect it from spraying water. There are too many cracks that will go unprotected and allow water to get into. Using one the 4x8 siding materials may be a better option. Properly flashed and sealed as if it were on the outside of the building.

You will also need to ventilate the space to prevent high humidity when you have plants growing in there.

 
mickblock's Avatar
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05-02-10, 09:30 AM   #5  
Good venting would be the most effective. Keeping allot of plants inside an enclosure just leads to higher levels of humidity right?
Unless you also plan on watering them by hurling waterballons at them I don't see an issue with that.

The paint depots do have an anti-microbial paint additive. So that was a very good point.

What... uh... kinda "nursery" we talkin bout here?

 
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