Insulation for enclosed porch (3 season room)

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  #1  
Old 03-29-11, 06:26 AM
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Insulation for enclosed porch (3 season room)

Hello all,

I recently purchased a home that has an enclosed porch off of the back of the house. I believe this addition was built to always be enclosed and was not a porch converted into an enclosed porch. There is a crawl space below that has access via a side access panel outside and has vents for air passage. There about 2ft of space above, between the ceiling and roof that has air ventilation as well. Currently this room has no HVAC running to it. The room is surrounded in windows, but only single paned ones. I live in the North East in Pennsylvania.

With that said I want to replace the inside wall paneling and stiffen up the flooring. I have some questions about materials that I should be using and was hoping to find some answers here.....

A.) The room is not currently heated or cooled but I hope to one day put a stand alone fireplace in there for heat. So in the meantime it will not be heated/cooled, but I want to prepare the room for when I move into that direction.
1.) So in terms of insulation are there any issues insulating the ceiling and floor without the room being temperature controlled?
2.) Should I being using vapor barrier on the floors and ceiling? Again not temp controlled so would this trap moisture?
3.) Does the crawlspace underneath which is dirt, require a 6mil vapor barrier as well to lay over the dirt?
4.) Should I use "Greenboard" drywall in the room and not regular drywall? Can drywall be used at all?

I appreciate any response. My main concern is not trapping in moisture because the room will not be hvac controlled. Note, there is currently insulation in the ceiling but not under the floor and when I bought the house the previous owner has plywood on the ceilings and all of the tape is peeling off at the seams where they used mud on it (I am assuming they used drywall mud), which makes me believe there is a high level of humidity in the room.

Thanks
-Matt
 
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  #2  
Old 03-29-11, 03:27 PM
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Matt:
1) No issue except that you should insulate it. You will realize a better temperate zone with insulation, regardless of the heat/cool situation.
2) Vapor barrier should be used toward the "warm" side, which is the living side. It would allow the insulation to breathe above, and keep moisture from exiting to that area.
3) Crawl needs 6 mil plastic run up on the walls and taped. Tape all seams as well. Is the crawlspace vented?
4) Regular drywall will do fine, but moisture resistant would be a bonus, and the cost is not that much more.
Since it is a 3 season room I would allow for some ventilation at all times just to keep moisture at bay. Plywood on the ceiling with sheetrock mud (couldn't find a smilie for "Puke). Definitely not the brightest bulb in the bunch.
Ventilation is a key. How many and what type windows do you have in there, now?
 
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Old 03-30-11, 05:11 AM
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Thanks for the response......

The crawlspace has two small doors for access that are not air sealed and it also has two small vents cut into the cinder blocks on either side for ventilation. Does there need to be 6mil on the dirt(ground) as well? Is the 6mil on the walls in the crawl required or more of another layer of protection?

I would say the room is about 20ftx30ft in size and has windows on 3 of the 4 walls. They are single paned windows, don't really know any more than that.

As for the plywood on the ceiling, my sentiments the same. Walking into the room alot of the tape is peeling at the seems, which could have been related to moisture in the room or a result of some interesting methods.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 05:30 AM
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The tape is falling off the plywood because sheetrock tape never should have been used on plywood in the first place. I'd also bet they pressed down so hard it pushed out all the mud behind the tape on that flat a surface.
What you can do if the plywood is in good shape and is flat is go right over it with new 5/8 sheetrock without removing the plywood. What I would do is use drywall adhesive and screws to hold it up, if you use the adhesive you can use 1/2 as many screws so there's less work when it comes time to finish it.
There's no need for green board, it's not a wet area.
If the plan is to change those windows nows the time to do it before you trim out the windows. It will save you, not cost you in the long run. You would soon see that single pane windows will sweat and will ruin the finish on the trim. An unvented gas heater puts a ton of moisture into the air.
One layer of 6 Mil. is all you need.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 06:49 AM
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Yes, you would put the 6 mil on the dirt, just bring it up onto the walls where you will tape it off, as well as tape all the seams. Sorry if I wasn't clear on that.
 
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Old 03-30-11, 12:15 PM
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When you say tape up the walls, am I fully enclosing the crawl space with plastic up to the floor joists and taping all seams? If so, I will be blocking off the vents that are cut into the cinder block on either side for ventilation.

Or am I running the plastic up the side wall, a foot or two off the ground just to prevent any moisture that would come up through the earth?

I appreciate the help, I want to ask questions to make sure that this is done correct.
Thanks
 
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