Greetings and Question...


  #1  
Old 04-14-13, 07:58 AM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Greetings and Question...

Hello Everyone,

I've got an unusual home insulation question.

We've just recently had our small double-dormered-cape well insulated by a team of pros. They did a great job with top and bottom of the house, however they found vermiculite in one wall, and regs forbid them from blowing in more cellulose insulation into the walls. Now, there are also three walls without any vermiculite that have 30+ year old cellulose insulation that has settled quite a lot. We really only need to insulate one and a half of the remaining wall-tops (because of other projects in the works).

My question is: What would be the pros/cons to different approaches for "topping off" the walls: renting a blower and blowing in more cellulose, or using "slow rise" foam to fill the voids at the tops of the walls? Or some other option? We'd prefer to not gut the walls, though drilling into the sheetrock from inside would be fine.

Thanks in advance for considering my question.

-Pir
 
  #2  
Old 04-14-13, 01:09 PM
B
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,460
Received 47 Upvotes on 43 Posts
Hi pir and welcome to the forum.
Not all vermiculite contains asbestos. If they did not have it tested, then it is just a guess and since the source of the contaminated vermiculite was Libby Montana an east coast application has a chance of being ok. Although they did produce the bulk of the vermiculite back then, there were other sources which were used. Vermiculite is still available today, certified asbestos free.

The bad news is that if one wall has asbestos, there is a high probability all walls and the ceiling had it. They were not prudent to blow in insulation anywhere without testing. The proper procedure would be to confirm you do or do not have asbestos and if you do, then have a certified company come in and clean the entire house. Once that is done and done properly, then the house can move forward.

Before you add to the other walls, you need to know. Last thing you want is to spread the contamination any further than it already has been.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 04-16-13, 01:07 PM
P
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2013
Posts: 2
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Upvotes on 0 Posts
Bud,

Thanks for the advice. I'm 99% sure only that one wall has vermiculite. The attic spaces definitely don't have it, as that entire area (was) essentially uninsulated. It seems that someone (likely a homeowner) poured bags of vermiculite into the stud bays in that wall (since they are accessible from the attic) rather than it being blown in. The other walls in the house DO have blown-in cellulose, and their stud bays are not accessible from the attic.

The vermiculite wall is full to the tip-top with it. The other walls that don't have vermiculite are only 2/3 or so full with cellulose (that was easy to see with the thermal camera), since it's settled and/or been taken away by rodents. Those are the ones I'm interested in "topping off".

I've made a couple calls to get the vermiculite tested, though for some reason no one is returning my calls (!?)

Quite frankly, we don't have the funds for an "asbestos abatement" situation, so it's highly unlikely we'd have the ability to actually get it all removed, regardless of the outcome of any testing.

Thanks again,

-Pir
 
  #4  
Old 04-18-13, 09:39 PM
Nashkat1's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2012
Location: USA
Posts: 7,458
Upvotes: 0
Received 6 Upvotes on 5 Posts
I've made a couple calls to get the vermiculite tested, though for some reason no one is returning my calls (!?)
Gee, imagine that happening right now!

Quite frankly, we don't have the funds for an "asbestos abatement" situation, so it's highly unlikely we'd have the ability to actually get it all removed, regardless of the outcome of any testing.
So just leave it alone. If it doesn't contain asbestos, who cares? And if it does, it won't/can't be released while the material is just sitting in place. One reason removing asbestos is expensive is that the company has to capture the stuff as they're stirring it up. Tricky.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: