Insulating interior of an exterior brick wall

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-05-13, 09:03 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2
Insulating interior of an exterior brick wall

Hi All,

First post on the forum.

We've recently bought a house built in the 1920's. As far as I can tell there is a single layer of brick between the inside and the outside. The house was all plaster but certain walls were just cracked and not worth repairing. I have one room that has 3 exterior brick walls. All the plaster, lathe, and furring strips have been removed.

I've gotten conflicting advice on how to rebuild the walls and how to use insulation in the new walls.

How would you insulate the brick walls, if at all? I'm planning on building out 2x4 walls leaving air space between the 2x4 wall (securing to ceiling and floor) and the brick wall.

Thanks.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-06-13, 12:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,997
Hi bk and welcome to the forum.
Brick is difficult, but knowing what the issues are can help. I'll add two very good links that explain much.

The problem is that bricks need to be able to dry and for the past 90 years it has had a gap behind it and some heat from the inside to help it do so. Now we try to improve our energy efficiency and no more heat. The links will explain about moisture vapor and how to identify "good bricks".

Let us know if you have more questions.

Bud
BSD-106: Understanding Vapor Barriers — Building Science Information

BSI-047: Thick as a Brick — Building Science Information
 
  #3  
Old 07-06-13, 09:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2013
Posts: 2
Thanks for the links!

I read through both articles and from what I understand, there needs to be a drain cavity between the wall I'm constructing and the brick veneer (it's a single layer between the interior and exterior).

It looks like figure 5 in the BSD-106 article would be the solution for my walls. We're in NY and winters here are hit and miss. We've recently had one where I don't think we ever got a real frost and then a year later it was brutally cold.

I took a look at the floor and ceiling near the brick walls and there are cavities for air to floor down and up. I'll make sure these are cleared of any mortar droppings before putting up the walls.

Would figure 5 work in your opinion?
 
  #4  
Old 07-07-13, 04:03 AM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: New England
Posts: 9,997
I would be the wrong person to say which one is correct. I provide the links in lieu of any meaningful experience with brick. Hammer and nails I do ok, but when I run into a brick house I'm right next to you asking questions (:.

In NY you may have some well defined building codes to guide your choices of insulation and materials. With the added knowledge from the links you should now be talking to your local code official for input and permit requirements. Do the new walls need to be load bearing, I don't know? Will your new wall need a continuous vapor seal? What r-value is required? How should it be attached to the brick? Many local code decisions.

Bud
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes