Indoor hot tub covers.


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Old 09-02-13, 10:20 AM
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Question Indoor hot tub covers.

We have a separate building for our hot tub, it will have a dehumidifier and exhaust system. The hot tub is in the floor. My question is about a cover. We have had a couple different kinds and they seem to serve little purpose. The door is child proof ( enough for the county). The cover we had in tracks was messy from oil ,the aluminum started breaking down and would leave black marks on your skin. it has a kind of 2 ski pole operating system. 1) Do we need one? why? What kind ?
 
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Old 09-02-13, 10:29 AM
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Welcome to the forums! What is your structure made of? If cedar, you most likely would need no covering. I would be concerned with SPF or even PT lumber and the moisture associated with a running hot tub. Build it like a sauna and you wouldn't have a problem leaving the cover off.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 10:47 AM
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The original structure was T111 AND PT. We gutted the inside walls because of rot. mold. insects , birds and rodents. We where planning to use expanding foam on the framing after repairs. Then plywood, tyvek and T111 on the outside. Inside would be concrete board and tile etc. We have talked about not tiling the ceiling but using cedar.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 10:51 AM
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In addition to the cbu, be sure to either use a vapor barrier or ensure the foam is completely filling the stud bays so no air mixes between the outside and inside. You'll need adequate venting up high and make up air down low to complete the cycle. Tile would be an excellent wall covering and you could use either on the ceiling, but if you use tile, be sure to slightly angle the ceiling so you don't have cold water dripping on your head while you are in the tub. Let it run down the walls to a drain. What are you going to do with the floor, or is it already concrete?
 
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Old 09-02-13, 10:59 AM
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The ceiling is angled already but we are planning to add an additional lower one so we have air flow above. The floor is concrete and we are adding an epoxy surface to that.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 12:00 PM
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Cool

Thanks for your help I guess we will research building a sauna.
 
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Old 09-02-13, 03:53 PM
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I would focus on a proper cover solution instead of or in addition to building a proper wet room. Our spa has been indoors for 15+ years without much special construction. Room humidity spikes when the cover is removed and the spa is used but the other 99% of the time to cover seals it tight so there is minimal water loss. A good cover is key to everything. Without it you're evaporating a lot of water and chemicals away and then have to deal with the humid air.

Do you have a photo of the room or how large is the spa?
 
 

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