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Moisture Problem on above ground Cinderblock wall.....need advice


greg683x's Avatar
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11-12-13, 02:24 PM   #1  
Moisture Problem on above ground Cinderblock wall.....need advice

Ok, so on the back of my house I have a cinderblock wall on the lower level of my house, it is above ground. Inside the house when I moved in there was wood paneling for the walls in these rooms (older house). I recently decided that I was going to remove the paneling and take the steps necessary to hang drywall for a better look. When I started removing the paneling I noticed the walls were built with small 1x2 studs with styrofoam sheets inbetween for a moisture barrier. Every place looked fine on the block wall except for one corner where it looks like there is a moisture problem. The wood was all rotted and the styrofoam was falling apart. the 2x4 between the top of the cinderblock and below the ceiling joists was rotted in the corner as well. I've included pictures below so you all can see what Im talking about. I guess what Im asking is what action do I need to take, if any? Im sure the previous method used for a moisture barrier was subpar so does doing it the right way when I reframe this wall eliminate any concern over this? or is there a bigger problem.

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also what would you recommend doing when I do frame out the new wall. What i had in mind right now is glueing the blue/pink foam boards to the cinderblock, hanging plastic, then framing the wall out and insulating between the studs.

Thanks in advance for any help

 
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11-12-13, 03:43 PM   #2  
You have a termite problem not a moisture problem.
Signs of Termite Infestations - Pictures - Inspections

 
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11-12-13, 04:33 PM   #3  
And once you get the termite issue resolved you may want to review your approach to finishing those walls.

Bud

 
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11-12-13, 05:00 PM   #4  
UUUUUUGGGGHHHHH!!

Thanks for pointing me in the right direction.

 
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11-12-13, 06:46 PM   #5  
Just be glad you pulled the paneling now and not 10 years from now .
Good call on Joe's part.

Bud

 
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11-15-13, 01:04 PM   #6  
So what would be the proper way to rebuild these walls off the cinderblock?

 
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11-15-13, 01:42 PM   #7  
Before anything you need to call an exterminator to come treat the whole house.
Please go to the search function at the top right and key word search "basement walls"
There's a couple thousands post on that one subject.

 
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11-15-13, 05:51 PM   #8  
ok i'll search.... i would hope you'd think that I wouldnt just ignore termites.....the house is scheduled to get treated on the 25th (though the bug guy said he believes the house has been treated before and not one termite was found, looks like just preexisting damage) Though I need to sleep at night! So i scheduled a treatment. That scared the crap out of me....

Before I search, does it make a difference though that this isnt a basement wall?? it's an above ground cinderblock wall on the ground level.

 
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11-15-13, 07:21 PM   #9  
Which Zone you are in makes a difference on fb R-value required; R-10 or R-17 (Mass wall) see footnote "i"; 2009 IECC Climate Zone Map - Maryland

Any insulating sheeting on the exterior?

Gary
PS. Welcome to the forums!

 
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11-16-13, 06:20 AM   #10  
nope no insulation on the outside either, just cinderblock on the outside and the inside as well.

So according to that website, I just need a minimum of r13 insulation in my wall, with probably a foam board between the cinderblock and new wall?

sorry for the constant questions, from the other links that Ive read, it's been hard for me to understand which rules apply to my situation and which dont.

 
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11-16-13, 02:01 PM   #11  
No questions = no answers, lol.

I was trying to find out if you are in a "cold" area or not, that is defined in this link, Fig.3 or 4 for you, depends on cold (ignore the stucco); BSD-012: Moisture Control for New Residential Buildings — Building Science Information

Gary

 
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