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Seal original dutch lap siding?


MarylandDIY's Avatar
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04-09-14, 01:21 PM   #1  
Seal original dutch lap siding?

Hello fellow DIY'ers, I am renovating my 1920 home in the Washington, DC area and I ended up completely gutting it so that I may properly seal and insulate it. My question is, with regards to its original dutch lap siding, should I seal each and every joint with construction adhesive?

Another concern is: at some point, presumably between 1938 and 1989, the former owners put felt over the dutch lap and resided with wavy asbestos shingles. After I wet spray cellulose into the cavities, I plan on using construction adhesive on the stud and plate faces to seal to the drywall and where the wall meets the ceiling. Will all of this lead to moisture being trapped, eventually dry-rotting the original dutch lap siding?

Thanks for any insight you can provide!

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04-09-14, 03:35 PM   #2  
No, don't caulk every joint. Your time and $$$ would be better spent cutting rips of foam board on a table saw to fit between your studs, if you are trying to create an air barrier. If you have a tight fit caulk the edges of foam with pl300 or similar after it is installed.

 
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04-10-14, 02:38 PM   #3  
Thank you, XSleeper. Is there a reason why you suggest foam board over damp sprayed cellulose? After much research, I decided to go with cellulose because 1) it's inexpensive (damp sprayed cellulose will cost me $1,000 with a contractor - foam board will cost at a minimum $2,500 for the same r-value) 2) it's sound dampening (I can hear my neighbors talk on their deck two houses down) and 3) it's fire and insect resistant.

Thanks again!

 
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04-10-14, 03:46 PM   #4  
I wasn't saying not to use cellulose. I was saying not to caulk cracks. Cover the siding with one. thin piece of foam board instead. It will serve as an air barrier for your cellulose. And if you ever tear the siding off in the future it will hold the cellulose in place and prevent it from all spilling out on the ground.

 
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04-10-14, 04:39 PM   #5  
The only problem I see with damp sprayed cellulose, is it will eventually dry and settle. Another option, although a might bit more expensive would be Roxul. Waterproof, fire retardant, and mold resistant. It is a stone product, so it is almost impervious with excellent insulative values.

 
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04-16-14, 12:16 PM   #6  
I see. Very interesting idea, XSleeper. I have considered residing but since the current siding is asbestos shingles (overtop the original dutch lap), I was going to put foam board over top the current siding with vertical strapping over the foam board. This is 5 or so years down the road but I like how youve thought ahead. However, the dutch lap acts as the sheathing and replacing it could be very expensive. Additionally, would the foam board then act as a vapor barrier as well? I thought any vapor barriers are supposed to be on the exterior? Or is it the interior? I haven't considered a vapor barrier since my climate is somewhat moderate.

 
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04-16-14, 12:19 PM   #7  
Chandler, from my understanding, damp sprayed cellulose is sprayed in at 3.5 lbs/ft3 and will not settle. The purpose of spraying in the damp cellulose would be to create the air barrier, reducing air infiltration. As for Roxul, I dont believe it would serve as a barrier since they are bats stuffed between the studs. Am I mistaken?

 
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