Frost inside closet

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  #1  
Old 09-25-14, 10:09 AM
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Frost inside closet

The closet wall was adjacent the exterior wall in a 1' by 1' area where I had a frost build up. Obviously when the weather changed it turned the drywall in that area to mold. Insulation had some discolouration but not much. I ripped out drywall. Couldn't really notice a draught but once I taped the vapour barrier back up I noticed it being sucked in and pushed out with any sorta windy condition outside. The house was built in 73.

I have no clue what to do or how to find this issue to correct. Looking for help!!
 
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  #2  
Old 09-25-14, 10:19 AM
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That's a tough situation as it sounds like you probably have poor insulation and air sealing throughout the rest of the house. You could leave that area of wall and closed door open for a few days to insure that it thoroughly dries then install the most R value you can and cover with moisture and mold resistant drywall.

I may help if there is some way you can get airflow into the closet. If it's full of stuff and the door is closed the heat of the house cannot keep it warm and even with the best insulation you'll likely get condensation and frost again.
 
  #3  
Old 09-25-14, 12:08 PM
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Hey pilot dan,
No theres barely anything in the closet. Im not sure what the r value of the punk batt thats in there now. I guess id have to take a chunk of it out and go to a bld supplies store to find out.

I know that theres poly vspour barrier
 
  #4  
Old 09-25-14, 12:11 PM
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I know theres poly vapour barrier...then pick batt....then sheathing..building paper then aluminum siding on this place built in 1973....can get cold up here in Alberta..
 
  #5  
Old 09-25-14, 12:12 PM
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How thick is the insulation? 3"-4" is usually R-11 or R-13, 5"-6" would be R-19
 
  #6  
Old 09-27-14, 04:57 PM
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Hey Marksr,

The batt insulation is 3-4" thick
 
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Old 09-27-14, 05:01 PM
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I was up into the attic and its filled with cellulose so I can't get over to that far wall (not enough room) to see if there's any issue on why the draught is making the poly vapour barrier move.

The walls tend to be a bit cold in that room that's towards the corner of the house.

Not sure what to do??
 
  #8  
Old 09-28-14, 04:23 AM
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Hi Burchell,
I'm not sure what this describes, "The closet wall was adjacent the exterior wall in a 1' by 1' area", a corner or a hole?

Or maybe it is just me being too old to read .

Anyway, a wall consists of 3 functional layers and sometimes one of those layers will serve more than one function. They are, an air barrier, a thermal barrier, and a moisture barrier. That poly that is billowing in and out with the wind is just a vapor barrier and what you see is normal. The drywall is your air barrier and when installed next to the poly the wind will have no effect, at least on the poly. Of course the third layer is the thermal barrier, the insulation.

The cold and resulting frost is exactly as has been explained, the closet is isolating that area from the heat. The pink batt insulation isn't the best for that 3.5" space so upgrading to a high density fiberglass or better yet Roxul. Roxul is a very dense mineral wool and will help with the air infiltration into that cavity from the outside.

While you have the cavity open, not sure how much has been removed, caulk all junctions between the sheathing and the framing. Depending upon the available space a layer of rigid insulation and sometimes be added over the stude on the inside before the new drywall is installed.

Bud
 
  #9  
Old 09-28-14, 02:34 PM
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Closet pics where frost was

[ATTACH]39015[/ATTACH


[ATTACH]

Can you see these pics? Frost was in that little area.
 
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  #10  
Old 09-28-14, 02:39 PM
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I merged your last post with the original thread or people won't know what you're talking about.

I only see one pic.
 
  #11  
Old 09-28-14, 02:46 PM
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The closet wall was adjacent the exterior wall in a 1' by 1' area where I had a frost build up. Obviously when the weather changed it turned the drywall in that area to mold. Insulation had some discolouration but not much. I ripped out drywall. Couldn't really notice a draught but once I taped the vapour barrier back up I noticed it being sucked in and pushed out with any sorta windy condition outside. The house was built in 73.

I have no clue what to do or how to find this issue to correct. Looking for help!!

Read more: http://www.doityourself.com/forum/in...#ixzz3EeJnToo4Name:  image.jpg
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  #12  
Old 09-28-14, 03:19 PM
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LOL, a picture is worth a thousand words, once you flip it right side up .

Very small area but obviously not enough heat getting into that closet. Options would be louvered doors or some other source of heat. Increasing the insulation in just that small area probably wouldn't make a big difference.

If leaving the door open when it is cold is an option, easy solution (from someone back a ways).

Bud

PS thanks Super Mod
 
  #13  
Old 09-28-14, 04:53 PM
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Yea leaving the door open helps it get heated up for sure. I just had figured rippin down the aluminum siding and putting on rigid foam board with tyvek would help solve the issue of helping to keep that room warm. I see most houses being built in alberta have insulation batt inbetween walls and also rigid foam board with tyvek wrap instead of that old construction paper which was used mainly back in the day
 
  #14  
Old 09-28-14, 04:59 PM
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Hey bud,

I appreciate your ideas but I did have frost on that closet wall interior where I cut the drywall out so whats the solution for no frost. If I just patch up that hole I'm pretty sure the same thing will happen again this winter.
 
  #15  
Old 09-28-14, 07:01 PM
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Adding 2" of rigid insulation on the outside would double your wall r-value, but it requires some major work to interface with the rest of the house and trim any windows. 1" or less and you are back to the problem I explained before of not keeping the inside of the rigid insulation warm enough.

There is all kinds of literature on rigid insulation on the outside and a lot of it originates from Canada. It is a major step, but when we have homes with thin walls it is sometimes the best option.

Bud
 
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