Foam Insulation for a Garage Door

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  #1  
Old 10-13-14, 11:55 AM
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Foam Insulation for a Garage Door

hi gents,

my question is, I am looking to insulate my garage door by using the foam Styrofoam panels that home depot or lowes offers. The Styrofoam offered at home depot on one side has a silver reflective coating, and on the other it has a green sticker.

my question is, which way should the silver foil face, inwards towards the garage to possible reflect any heat inwards towards the house during the winter? or should the reflective silver side be glued to the garage sheet metal panel, possibly reflecting summer hear to keep it out of the garage?

what would you guys recommend?

please check out the other thread I started to get some more background into

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/ga...rage-door.html

any advice is greatly appreciated,

thanks gents

cheers bp
 
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  #2  
Old 10-15-14, 06:14 PM
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What? Nobody?

My thought is foil to the warmer side, weather you want to heat it in the winter and that's more important, or keeping summer heat out.

You won't really have that much heat loss from the house...(or at least you shouldn't) so the factor would be, do you plan to install heat in their?
 
  #3  
Old 10-16-14, 09:46 PM
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no I am not planning on putting a heater inside the garage. so from what you said, do you mean silver foil side is glued to the garage door panel? or is the silver foil side towards the inside of the garage?
 
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Old 10-16-14, 11:21 PM
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Foil to the outside (garage door) if heat gain in the summer is the issue. Foil to the inside if cold in the winter is the issue.
 
  #5  
Old 10-17-14, 04:58 AM
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Why may I ask are you wanting to insulate the doors. Many of my neighbors have been replacing their garage doors and opt for insulated. I did not and saved about $600 in the deal. My reasoning...If you're not using the garage for any other reason than car and equipment storage, then insulation is a waste. However, if you're going to utilize the garage in the winter to work on equipment or if you may spend time in it during cold weather then fine, insulate. None of the neighbors use their garage other than car storage.

PS...I don't think the foil face in either direction will make much difference. What is more important are the other remaining three walls insulated. Save some money and use unfaced foam board.
 

Last edited by Norm201; 10-17-14 at 05:00 AM. Reason: added PS
  #6  
Old 10-17-14, 05:39 AM
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id like to insulate the garage door because it costs $1000 to buy an insulated door, while it while cost me say $100 to insulate it myself. It gets real cold in the winter and hot in the summer, and it affects the temperature in my bedroom which is located directly above the garage. Yes all of the other walls are insulated.

Gunguy - cold in the winter and hot in the summer are both the issues because they both affect the temp in my bedroom directly above. So maybe get the stuff with the foil on both sides? another question, do you think the foil will actually do anything if its glued right up to the garage door panel? or does there have to be an air gap for be affective?
 
  #7  
Old 10-17-14, 07:50 AM
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In general, I would agree with Norm, in that there would be no gain in insulating an overhead door in an unheated garage, because any residual heat is lost the minute the door is opened, but, nevertheless, I did the same to ours 10-15 years ago, and have conducted no tests whatsoever, but honestly believe that it does not get as cold in there as it did before I added the insulation. So yes, I would do it again. The ribs on the inside of our door happens to be such that I was able to slip the individual pieces behind the rib above, then slide them back down behind the bottom rib so that they are fully supported with no adhesive. As for orientation, there are pro's on here whose opinions I value, but I honestly don't think it matters much in this case, so I would go whichever ways is most aesthetically pleasing. The hot and cold sides of a garage door can vary dramatically day to day, and sometimes even morning to afternoon, so it's a coin toss as to which way convection and condensation are moving.
 
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Old 10-17-14, 08:34 AM
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So maybe get the stuff with the foil on both sides?
If you want to...but I agree with others, the value of the foil will be miniscule IMO. I was hoping someone knowledgeable in insulation and radiant barriers would weigh in, but oh well. If there is a big price difference between foil faced and plain, get the plain.

Like I said before, I wouldn't want foil on the inside just for the ugly factor.
 
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