Lots of cold infiltration. Need help!

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Old 11-26-14, 07:01 PM
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Lots of cold infiltration. Need help!

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Size:  37.6 KBSo I did a bit of investigating in my bedroom which is the master on a 2nd floor cape style house. The room was renovated except for the front which still retains the original wood paneling. I'm getting a lot of cold air infiltration at these wood panels at the corners where they meet as well as where they meet the floor. I've attached a photo of a corner of the room that has this wood paneling. What is the best way to seal these joints to prevent the cold air from coming in? Thanks in advance.
 
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Old 11-26-14, 08:18 PM
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Wood paneling is difficult to seal without destroying its appearance. It should have been installed over drywall which was taped and sealed.

Do you know what is behind the paneling, plastic, insulation, or anything else?

Air leakage is a two part problem, what you feel coming in is matched by what is leaking out. If you have infiltration on the second floor, either the wind is blowing or there are some huge leaks above the level where you are experiencing the cold. If you have an attic hatch, be sure it is well air sealed and insulated. Recessed lights may also be leaking. The list of possibilities is long so I'll attach a related link. http://www.efficiencyvermont.com/ste...ide_062507.pdf

Also one on Capes: Two Ways to Insulate Attic Kneewalls - Fine Homebuilding Article

Bud
 
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Old 11-27-14, 03:35 AM
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This paneling is original to the house from the 50s. I don't think there's any Sheetrock behind it.
I was thinking of caulking where the panels meet. Would caulk stick to the wood paneling ?
 
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Old 11-27-14, 04:43 AM
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Not sure what we are looking at in your picture. Close ups don't tell us much. If that is a corner, you may want to caulk the joint with a brownish caulk, then place an inside corner molding over the crack to hide the caulk. Again, not sure what the overall looks are.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 05:27 AM
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Sorry about that. Yes that is a corner where two panels are meeting at 90 degrees. What kind of caulk should I use? Silicone or polyurethane?
 
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Old 11-27-14, 06:29 AM
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Use a brownish elastomeric if you can find it. I wouldn't use silicone, but a silicone based acrylic would work fine.
 
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Old 11-27-14, 06:47 AM
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I'd probably use a clear siliconized acrylic latex caulk. It goes on milky but dries clear. It can get milky again if it gets wet but will go back to clear when dry. It wouldn't be a bad idea to apply a coat of poly after the caulking dries as that will prevent the caulk from attracting dirt.
 
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