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Insulation for storage room below split-level entry way

Insulation for storage room below split-level entry way

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  #1  
Old 11-18-15, 06:49 PM
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Insulation for storage room below split-level entry way

Have a bit of a head scratcher here. My house has a storage room beneath the front door entry way/staircases, which seems to be typical of split-levels. Our entry way also has a closet that bumps out into the garage. Directly below the closet is a hollow space, with no insulation. In the storage area, the floor joists cross the sill plate and extend into the garage. My problem is that to insulation the floor joist/sill plate area, they just stuffed some insulation in there. Cold air comes streaming in since it's obviously not an air tight seal. I was going to cut some pink Foamular pieces and caulk them into place, but the flammable aspects of Foamular has me second guessing that. What's the best way to seal these spaces? Here's a picture that shows what the problem is. The sill plate is the bottom piece of wood. Floor joist to the right, extending into the garage. There are about 8 of these spanning the ceiling of the storage space. Any ideas?
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This is the empty space directly beneath the closet floor.
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I don't know why they didn't insulate this area, or if that's even an option. I just want to stop this cold air from getting into my house. Any help would be awesome! Thanks.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-18-15, 07:25 PM
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I don't have a good picture of what you are describing, but air leaks must be stopped. Also, any path from a garage to the living space must be air sealed and have a fire rated barrier, often drywall.

Now, an insulation layer doesn't have to be an air barrier and the other way around. So, any rigid barrier, i. e. that sheetrock layer, can be your air barrier. Then stuff away after the air path is sealed.

Maybe a picture from the garage side would help me.

Bud
 
  #3  
Old 11-19-15, 04:45 AM
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Thank Bud. Here is a picture from the garage. Everything below the horizontal tape line is empty, just open space. Never mind all the duct tape, and never mind the fact that the radon tube doesn't have a firestop collar on it. I'll be dealing with that later.Name:  IMG_2369.jpg
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And here is a picture from the other side, in the storage room, of one of the spaces stuffed with insulation. This one happens to be the space that the radon pipe goes through, but all the rest look about the same.
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  #4  
Old 11-19-15, 05:04 AM
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Still not clear, I'm thick. Does that radon pipe make a left turn to become the pipe I see in the other picture?

Usually the floor joists in the house are running parallel to the garage, sounds/looks like yours are perpendicular.

Anyway, air seal, air seal, air seal, with insulation everywhere you can.

Bud
 
  #5  
Old 11-19-15, 08:08 AM
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Yes, that pipe does take a left turn and heads into the storage space.

So I guess my next question is what is the best way to seal this up? Using drywall would be cheap but there seems to be nothing to attach it to, unless I screwed some small strips of wood to the joists to kind of provide a frame for the drywall. Or is there a better solution? And should I worry about the huge empty space below the closet? Would it pay to fill that with insulation? I'm thinking no, but don't want to assume anything at this point.
 
  #6  
Old 11-19-15, 08:49 AM
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It looks like foil faced rigid insulation on the inside of the foundation. If that is same on the inside of that empty space, then no additional insulation would be needed, but never hurts.

Strips of wood works fine. Where the radon pipe goes through, cut a piece to fit with a hole in it as if the pipe wasn't there. Then cut that piece horizontally right through the center of the hole, giving you matching pieces, one for above and the other for below. Let caulking seal up the seam.

Can you access the bottom of those joists through the empty space?

Bud
 
  #7  
Old 11-19-15, 09:35 AM
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The foil faced insulation is only on the foundation. The empty space has nothing. Nothing on the exterior side of the foundation, and nothing on the drywall side in the garage. My hope is that by sealing up the joists that no air will get in. The closet floor may get cold, but we have a big shoe rack thing on it so no one would ever feel it.

And are you saying I could just use wood, and not drywall, so seal the joist space? Guess I'm not sure why I thought I had to use drywall. Using wood would make it much easier to attach the pieces to the joists instead of trying to rig something up to attach the drywall to. If I use wood do I have to worry about the insulation in there touching the wood and getting wet? Don't want to have a mold problem in there.

I can access the bottom of the joists through the empty space, but I'd have to wreck the part where the foil tape is to get at it. And since it's almost winter here I'm not sure I want to start hacking that apart. That might be a spring/summer project.

Thanks for all the help so far, it's been a huge help!
 
  #8  
Old 11-19-15, 10:16 AM
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Drywall as an air block can serve as both the fire block and air block. If you already have a layer of drywall between the garage and the house then wood is just fine.

You are right, this is the time of year to be wrapping things up, not starting new projects. I say that as I just came down from doing a last minute roof replacement, delaying may must finish siding work. I'm taking advantage of mother nature, but she will certainly be here eventually.

Bud
 
  #9  
Old 12-03-15, 10:31 AM
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Well I finally was able to get this project going. As I was putting the wood in place to block these holes off I could feel the cold air streaming in and then stop once I got the wood screwed in. So I'm optimistic that this will result in some better temps in this area and stop this heat loss. Thanks for all the help Bud!
 
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