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Converted garage is too hot!


brooke2287's Avatar
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08-11-16, 07:46 AM   #1  
Converted garage is too hot!

I need some help guys! lol..So we have a converted garage but in the first room which we use as a laundry/micro kitchen it has exposed unfinished ceiling. The other room separated by a door is the bedroom and bathroom and it is finished with a window unit AC. We are in Florida and that first room gets soooo hot. Does anyone have any suggestions for a easy/cheapest solution to keep the exposed beams but still insulate to cut down on the heat. Thank yoU!

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08-11-16, 09:15 AM   #2  
Your living in a toaster oven.

The radiant heat coming from the sheathing from the roof is your problem.
The only way to block that radiant heat is to cover all that wood with insulation.


~ Pete ~

 
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08-11-16, 09:52 AM   #3  
You need to frame it out so you can hang a ceiling, insulate and provide as much attic ventilation as you can. Attics in fla get too hot not to have adequate insulation and ventilation!


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brooke2287's Avatar
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08-12-16, 07:58 AM   #4  
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Lol a toaster oven indeed. Luckily for us that is the only room that is hot and not insulated. The other part seperated by the door has a finished ceiling and a window AC unit. What do you think of this suggestion someone gave us:


2X2 nailers ran against the roof deck, then Styrofoam insulation, and paneling cut to fit between the beams.

This gives insulation, and leaves exposed beam look.

Might use a foil backed insulation, to radiate the heat back onto the roof, but this can cause asphalt shingles to melt.

 
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08-12-16, 08:29 AM   #5  
How thick would the styrofoam be?
Not my area of expertise but I don't think that plan would give you enough insulation.


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08-12-16, 09:01 AM   #6  
I didn't comment on that suggestion on the other forum where you got it but I'm with Mark, I don't see it making much difference.

 
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08-26-16, 06:40 PM   #7  
Enclosing the ceiling?

So do you guys think just enclosing the ceiling would be a better option? is that a huge expense and a big undertaking?

 
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08-27-16, 03:39 AM   #8  
Enclosing the ceiling, insulating and providing ventilation in the attic will provide the most benefit.

IMO it isn't that difficult to do but a lot depends on your skill set, we can walk you thru it. Hard to quantify expensive but it's not overly expensive. Basically you'd frame up the ceiling, insulate and install drywall [or whatever] Did you ever say how big the room is?


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