Tongue and Groove ceiling

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Old 05-18-17, 02:04 PM
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Tongue and Groove ceiling

I am new to this forum and look forward to helping in any way I can. I have searched all the T&G questions and my issue is somewhat unique. I have a home, built in 1953. The roof was originally tar and gravel and is consider a flat roof. I do not have an attic. The decking for my roof is the 2 X 6 Pine T&G. I recently had the roof replaced with base coat of rolled asphalt and top coat of with rolled asphalt with granules. The entire house is supported with 4 X 12 wooden beams. I need advice how to best insulate from the inside. I want to keep the T&G look and have found 3/4 T&G. Appreciate any suggestions you can provide. Thanx....
 
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Old 05-18-17, 02:23 PM
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Welcome to the forums!

If I understand correctly you'd fill the joists cavities with insulation and then attach the new T&G to the bottom of the joists. Local code may dictate that there be a drywall fire barrier between the new T&G and the joists/cavity.
 
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Old 05-18-17, 02:26 PM
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If I follow you, your 4x12 beams (rafters) are probably 4' on center and your 2x decking lays flat across the top of that?
 
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Old 05-22-17, 04:59 PM
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X Sleeper, correct. The T&G lies on top of the beams. I have room I believe to insulate from the interior side....we are now dealing with 90+ temps here in S Florida and I get 100+ with the infrared gun radiating down from the ceiling.
 
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Old 05-22-17, 07:19 PM
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Depending on which way you want to run your tongue and groove boards, you could probably just frame between your existing rafters... put up a 2x4 or 2x6 perimeter that is tight to the ceiling, then fill it in with studs 16" on center.

Then professional spray foam will be the best insulation for that cavity...

Then drywall, assuming your code requires it...tape the joints, then apply your tongue and groove. Running 4' long pieces perpendicular between the rafters would likely look best.
 
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Old 05-23-17, 03:17 PM
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X Sleeper thank you for your input. Any need for a vapor barrier. Is the sprayed foam a much higher R value than fiberglass insulation.
 
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Old 05-23-17, 03:34 PM
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AFAIK they will use the right kind of foam for the job... yes, it's superior to fiberglass in every way.
 
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