Easier-to-work-with alternative to GreatStuff?


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Old 09-05-17, 04:57 AM
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Easier-to-work-with alternative to GreatStuff?

GreatStuff is *great* for quickly filling in large gaps in areas that you don't care if they're unsightly.
However for interior areas that I'd like to have look somewhat presentable, the bubbly uneven hardened GreatStuff can be an eyesore.
Is there an alternative product that, upon spraying, can be wiped clean and result in a somewhat even surface. I tried GreatStuff and plastic gloves to smooth it out as it seeps out of the cracks but it's sticky and messy and not at all smooth.
 
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Old 09-05-17, 07:05 AM
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Caulk would be the only thing I can think of to get a workable finish. If the gap is too large then something else needs to be used to fill or cover it before making it look good. What is the gap, wood, sheetrock, other?

Bud
 
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Old 09-05-17, 07:12 AM
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Caulk was the thing which came to my mind reading your question as well.
 
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Old 09-05-17, 08:53 AM
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the bubbly uneven hardened GreatStuff can be an eyesore.
I can not even think of what this would be used for inside that requires a clean look, What are you trying to do?
 
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Old 09-05-17, 09:21 AM
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There are a couple sizeable separations of vertical trim from drywall. It's an old house and the separation is maybe 1" but it goes deep in so caulk would only empty itself into a black hole
 
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Old 09-05-17, 11:19 AM
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Caulk does need some kind of backer. That said, I would be more comfortable responding if I could see some pictures.
 
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Old 09-06-17, 04:45 AM
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There's a guest in there now so I won't be able to get a picture of the actual place for a few weeks but this is an example of a gap that I'm talking about
 
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Old 09-06-17, 05:22 AM
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Why not cover the inside corner with an additional trim? Cove, base shoe, or quarter round, etc. Then caulk the edges of that before you paint.
 
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Old 09-06-17, 10:14 AM
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for me it's time.
it's an old house that I can't justify hauling a compressor, nail gun, and saw out there in addition to the caulk when I could just squirt some great stuff in there and also have insulation within minutes
 
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Old 09-14-17, 12:01 PM
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You don't have to air nail it. Hammer and a punch will work just as well.
Do it once, do it right.
 
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Old 09-14-17, 12:28 PM
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Hand saw, Power drill Could pre-drill holes ( not to split wood) nails and punch/nail set. I agree with X and kramttocs (Do it once, do it right.) . Dont need any power tools for a small job like this.
Thats after squirting non expanding GS!
 
 

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