Insulating small space above entry door

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  #1  
Old 02-10-19, 08:50 AM
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Insulating small space above entry door

I found out that the space overhanging the entry door has no insulation.
I was able to look inside the space from the inside of the house by moving a can light out of the way. Where it transitions from drywall to plywood, that is the outside exposed white ceiling with no insulation.

I am looking for some ideas on how to insulate with minimal impact. Would it be possible to spray or blow in insulation form the can light opening from the inside?

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  #2  
Old 02-10-19, 11:30 AM
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If you mean the exterior ceiling I don't know that there would be any benefit from insulating it.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 11:42 AM
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I'm assuming there is a 2nd story floor above the top of those cantilevered floor joists.

Best way to get to it is to just open up the drywall ceiling. There should be netting installed between the joists directly above the top plate to close off that space, then they can blow cellulose or fiberglass into that cantilevered area.

No, they cannot do it properly from a light fixture.
 
  #4  
Old 02-10-19, 11:57 AM
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@marksr There is a bathroom above and the space from the door extends through the hallway. Cold air going into bathroom and through hallway into entire house

@xsleeper yes. I was hoping they could blow a large amount that it woudl cover the outside wall and enough on top of the outside ceiling. If I take down the ceiling drywall I could put standard insulation mats myself?

Also, should I worry about vapor barrier in this process?
 

Last edited by destruct05; 02-10-19 at 12:30 PM.
  #5  
Old 02-10-19, 12:50 PM
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You dont have to worry about vapor barrier if you are filling with cellulose.

In the upstares you state bathroom and hall, bathroom probably has tile but hallway if carpeted could be pulled back and opened up for filling.

I can imagine that was making for a cold floor!
 
  #6  
Old 02-10-19, 12:54 PM
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Unfortunately, upstairs is bathroom with tile...
 
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Old 02-10-19, 01:37 PM
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You can hope all you want but that won't make it possible. And no, fiberglass batts are not the thing to use there. Even if you could get to it, the voids (triangular spaces) in the floor trusses are best filled with blow in, either cellulose or fiberglass. And just sticking a hose in and turning it on full blast will not fill the space up, that's not how it works.

You would open up the drywall, add cleats if needed, staple up some insulation fabric, (to wall off the cantilever area from the interior floor joist area) cut an X in the fabric in each bay... then run the blow in hose back there and withdraw it as it fills up, before moving to the next bay.

The space (including the rim) needs to be completely filled top to bottom otherwise you get air passing above the insulation and that's what makes the upstairs floor cold.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 02:26 PM
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ok. How much drywall do you recommend cutting? A couple of inches from wall, door and light?
 
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Old 02-10-19, 02:34 PM
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If I was doing it, I'd cut no closer than 2" from each wall, (left right and front) and then cut out a 16" wide strip. Leaving the 2" perimeter will make it easier to tape and finish. You will just add a little backing for the drywall to screw to once you're done insulating.
 
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Old 02-10-19, 04:26 PM
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to wall off the cantilever area from the interior floor
No need to block off the area outside the 2nd story, there are no vents, just fill it all with insulation, the extra insulation outside the living area will cause no harm.

That way you will minimize the amount of drywall you will need to open up which will make the resulting patch easier!
 
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Old 02-10-19, 04:42 PM
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Just to clarify the planned cut area?
 
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Old 02-10-19, 04:45 PM
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Yes, that's pretty much what I would do.
 
  #13  
Old 02-16-19, 06:22 AM
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My contractor specified to spray Owens Corning Propink L77 fiberglass.
Is there any disadvantage over cellulose?
 
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Old 02-16-19, 06:35 AM
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Nope.???...........................
 
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Old 02-16-19, 10:30 AM
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still don't need to worry about vapor barrier?
 
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Old 02-16-19, 12:06 PM
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Nope. Today's thinking is that unless you live in the extreme north of Canada, your paint is the only vapor barrier you need.
 
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