Family Room over Unheated Garage

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  #1  
Old 01-01-02, 04:57 AM
cbarry
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Question Family Room over Unheated Garage

Hello,
I have searched this forum, but can't seem to find the exact answer I need. Hopefully somebody can help me.

A year ago, we bought a 2 story house, with a drive-under garage, that is located directly below our family room. The family room is often cold in the winter, so I checked out the ceiling in the garage.

The garage ceiling is not finished with sheetrock, or other covering. I read in another post, that this may be a code violation I live in Norcross, GA (Gwinnett Cty.). How can I check on this. Anyway, there is R-11 faced batts fiberglass insulation (that looks like it has seen better days) in between the studs. The studs are 2x10, with a 16" spacing between studs.

My question is: What is the best way to insulate the ceiling of the garage?

Thank you so much for any help.
cbarry
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  #2  
Old 01-01-02, 10:46 AM
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Location: Arlington, WA
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First, the garage ceiling should 5/8" Type "X" sheetrock on it, since it is a fire wall between the garage and the living space of the house. Second, with 2X10 joists, you have plenty of room for new insulation, up to R-30. So, replace the R-11 with R-30, then sheetrock the garage ceiling and fire tape the joints. Either get lots of help, or rent jacks to install the sheetrock. It's too heavy and awkward for one person to handle safely overhead.
 
  #3  
Old 01-01-02, 11:27 AM
cbarry
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Thanks, lefty

Lefty,
Thanks for the quick reply. I will be getting to work on the insulation and sheetrock soon. I guess I will need to do the same in the basement area adjacent to the garage, which is directly below our kitchen and dining room.

It is a bummer to find out the previous owners did not have this type of thing done-- AND that my home inspector missed it when he did the inspection. Unfortunately, a year has passed since we moved here, so I don't think we have much recourse in terms of recovering cost of insulation or sheetrock.

Sincerely,
cbarry
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  #4  
Old 01-01-02, 03:17 PM
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You're looking at a few hundred dollars for the insulation and sheetrock, and with a little help, a project that could be done in a day. From that standpoint, it's probably not worth pursuing. And yes, the basement area should be walled off from the garage using the same Type "X" sheetrock.

Check with your local bldg. dept. to see exactly what codes apply where you are. It's very possible no code violation exists where you are. (Doesn't mean it's safe, just that no code to the contrary has been adopted.) If your house were located in CA like that and had been sold a year ago, chances are very good that several people would have lost their license over it.
 
  #5  
Old 01-01-02, 10:26 PM
cbarry
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Thanks, lefty.
I think I will tackle the insulation project first. When it gets a little warmer, I may check around and see how much it will cost for someone to drywall the ceiling. I have worked with drywall a long time ago, and I remember it is HEAVY!

I am not sure now the drywall will work, since there are a lot of ducts in this ceiling, some of which would be above and some below the level of a ceiling. I guess we would just cut the drywall around the ductwork?!?

cbarry
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  #6  
Old 01-02-02, 08:16 AM
Resqman
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You just use some 2x4 and build a box around the duct work and sheet rock the box.

If you are not hanging the sheetrock, why do you care what the temp is? A normal crew could hang the rock and get 2 coats of mud on the seams in one day. The second day they would come back and slap the third coat of mud in a hour or so. Done. Since it is a garage, you can close the door to limit wind and temperature.

Of course you are getting snow today and in Gwinett, that is taramount to the city shutting down. Quick, run to the store and buy a loaf of bread, a gallon of milk, a dozen eggs, and a case of beer before they sell out. :^)

If you had bought the insulation on the way home, you could install it while you are snowed in the next 3 days.
 
  #7  
Old 01-02-02, 11:07 AM
cbarry
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Talking

lol, Resqman. That is SO true. My business closed early today, as the snow melted on the streets. Gotta love the south. Thanks for the tips on insulation and dry walling the ceiling.
Some very good points. Just don't know if I want to shell out all of those bucks at one time for insulation AND drywalling, both of which I figure will be quite pricey.

cbarry
 
  #8  
Old 01-09-02, 04:00 PM
gpn1021
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I must live in a house from the same builder - no sheetrock over garage, 3 1/2" insulation, cold basement, cold first floor (I also live in Gwinnett County!).

My question - would insulation over the basement ceiling help keep the other 1/2 of the first floor warm? If so - faced or unfaced?

Thank you!
 
  #9  
Old 01-09-02, 04:52 PM
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Location: Arlington, WA
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gpn1021, the insulation will only block the cold air infiltration in the area that it is applied. If you want to keep the floor in the other 1/2 of the house from feeling as cold, you'll have to insulate it too. (Assuming, of course, that it is on a raised wood floor, not on a concrete slab.)
 
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