water spots in new home

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  #1  
Old 01-15-02, 02:32 PM
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Angry water spots in new home

We have just finished construction and moved into our new home. See www.picturetrail.com/ktrude for pics of the house. We had nuwool insulation blown into the house, ceilings and walls. We are now experiencing about 6 spots of water on the ceiling due to what I feel is condensation. The roofer has checked over the house and can't find any leaks. Has anyone had any experience with this type of insulation and if you have, have you had any problems with it. You can wring out the insulation it is so wet in some spots. There is a ridge vent running along the top of the house but the insulation is blown right tight into it. If anyone has any suggestions it would be greatly appreciated.

thanks,

Karla
 
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  #2  
Old 01-15-02, 04:55 PM
Insulman
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Is the moisture occuring in the Cathedral Ceiling area or in a flat ceiling area? What state did you build this house in? All I can see in the picture shown at your web site is the Cathedral Ceiling. From what I see in that picture it appears that they did not put the blue stryrofoam baffles in every truss space. When the roof is conventionally framed as yours is, it is normally reccommended that you install styrofoam vents continuosly between each cavity from soffit to ridge vent. Did they actually install the nu-wool product in the Cathedral Ceiling or did they use fiberglass batts in that area. Are all the water spots in the same area?

Sorry for all the questions, but it might be easier for me to help with more knowledge on your situation.


Jim
 
  #3  
Old 01-16-02, 05:13 AM
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I know that they put the baffles in some areas but not all of them. Only one of the spots is in the cathedral ceiling. The rest of the spots are all in the loft area where the trusses begin. The house is built in Pennsylvania. I have been talking to many people about ventilation and vapor barriers in the ceilings. I know that the nuwool supposedly doesn't have to breath. But now I am being told by all of the professionals that I've talked to that you should have a 2" or so space so that the house can breathe. If you have any more questions, please ask and I'll try to answer as best as possible.
 
  #4  
Old 01-20-02, 04:44 PM
Insulman
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To my understanding Nu-Wool and other cellulose manufactures claim that in wet spray applications they can fill an entire cavity in conventionally framed ceilings and this will alleviate the moisture problem. I am afraid nobody will know for sure if this is accurate until there are thousands of homes and time passes to see what occurs.

However this should be something they guarantee, so fortunately you may have recourse if you find the product installation is causing this problem..

A few things you might check

Look in attic and see how the bathroom ceiling fans exhaust. It should run to either the soffit, or roof vents. Also see how the kitchen fan venting is exhausted through the attic.

Generally speaking it is good to have at least a 2" minimum clearance between the roof deck and any insulation to allow for air flow.


It might be a good idea for you to contact another professional Insulation Company and have them take a look at your home. Be willing to offer them some form a payment for this service, as they are not likely to look at it because there isnt much chance they will get any business from you.


Good Luck

Jim
 
  #5  
Old 01-20-02, 04:48 PM
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Thank you for the advice. The insulators are going to be cutting some holes in the ceiling to get up into the problem area on Tuesday. They had an infrared camera here last week and it showed that the whole roof of the house is damp. So we definitely have a condensation problem. I will let you know what our sultion is so that if you ever here of a problem like this, you can tell them how we solved it. Thank you very much again for any and all advice that was offered.

Karla
 
  #6  
Old 01-20-02, 08:01 PM
grausch
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Originally posted by Insulman
Is the moisture occuring in the Cathedral Ceiling area or in a flat ceiling area? What state did you build this house in? All I can see in the picture shown at your web site is the Cathedral Ceiling. From what I see in that picture it appears that they did not put the blue stryrofoam baffles in every truss space. When the roof is conventionally framed as yours is, it is normally reccommended that you install styrofoam vents continuosly between each cavity from soffit to ridge vent. Did they actually install the nu-wool product in the Cathedral Ceiling or did they use fiberglass batts in that area. Are all the water spots in the same area?

Sorry for all the questions, but it might be easier for me to help with more knowledge on your situation.


Jim
I thought baffles (vents) were just required in an area to keep the insulation from blocking airflow. Is it required between every truss from the soffit to the ridge vent?
 
  #7  
Old 01-21-02, 05:00 AM
Insulman
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Baffles are only necessary to be contuinuos in conventionally framed ceiling areas.

ie 2" x 12", 2"x10", That is assuming also that you are putting the maximum insulation thickness in these areas. For instance in a 2" x 12" constructed ceiling if you use fiberglass you can install either a 10 1/4" thick R-30 batt or a high density 10" R-38 batt for maximum insulation benefit. To ensure that the inualtion doesnt block off air flow in these areas I would highly reccommend continuous baffles.. In Open attic areas baffles are only necessary when the insulation is thicker than the space between the outer wall and the underside roof deck. This allows for air flow from the soffits to flow freely to the attic area.

Jim
 
  #8  
Old 01-21-02, 05:29 PM
grausch
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Owens Corning recommends a two inch gap between baffles, and then add the rolled insulation. Avoid starting and stopping the roll in the gap. This is to allow moisture to enter the airflow. Do you think that is wise?

Thanks for your help!
 
  #9  
Old 01-22-02, 03:45 AM
Insulman
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Sounds reasonable to me.

Jim
 
  #10  
Old 01-31-02, 04:41 PM
Insulman
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Hi Joy,

Was curious as to what was the final verdict on the moisture problem? Did you get the issue resolved? If so how did you address it?

Jim
 
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