Blue Rug Juniper dying?

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  #1  
Old 05-02-05, 02:32 AM
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Blue Rug Juniper dying?

I planted 14 young Blue Rug Junipers on our berm about 10 years ago. They spread wonderfully to cover the berm, but for the past year now, there are a lot of brown areas. I try to trim out the brown areas, but they keep reappearing -- and the more I trim the less dense the shrubs! Does this mean the shrubs are on their last leg? I fertilize regularly with an evergreen slow-release fertilizer, and drip irrigate. Might the problem be nematodes? (the UNbenefical kind) Could voles be grawing at the roots? Any ideas are welcome! Thanks in advance.
 
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  #2  
Old 05-02-05, 11:52 AM
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Generally, junipers are tolerant of many adverse soil and water conditions.

The most serious diseases of certain junipers is Phomopsis blight, which causes the ends of branches to become brown. This disease is usually not serious in the landscape but can be controlled by spraying the young foliage several times during spring and summer with a fungicide such as Benomyl.

Spider mites may become serious during hot weather and can be controlled when first seen with a miticide. Bagworms can be picked off the foliage or sprayed when small with an insecticide such as Sevin.

It may be the Phomposis, since it recurs despite trimming. Try the spray. If the plants are still vigorous, but struggling; they will pull through.

Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 05-03-05, 06:20 AM
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Will try the fungacide first...

Thanks for the rapid response, Chris. I'll try spraying the Benomyl fungacide first (since it's definitely NOT hot yet here in Michigan!). But, while I'm at the garden supply store, I'll pick up some Sevin too. Will post back in a month or so with results (hopefully, positive!)
 
  #4  
Old 05-07-05, 10:53 PM
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Make sure you planted blue rug and not blue chip. Blue chip is beautiful but as it grows older the centers die out and turn brown and unsightly.

Phomopsis twig blight is a juniper problem. It is a fungal disease that causes small lesions on the twigs. When many branches become infected, the overall appearance is gray, ragged, and unsightly. Blight begins at the tips and can spread killing entire branches or plants.

Junipers are also primarily subject to rust, scale, mites and bag worms. In most commercial applications, whether creeping or upright, in front of restuarants, banks, and other buildings I see an enormous number of bag worms. Those folks appear to hire a landscape company to do plantings but seem to not know that plantings need maintenance and insect control.

Blue Rug juniper plants thrive in full sun and prefer well-drained soil with an acidic pH. Blue Rug is usually considered low maintenance. But, every home where there was blue rug juniper, I regularly lifted branches each spring and pruned when I did my spring cleaning in order to remove any debris, such as leaves, that got blown in and to allow light and air circulation in the thick mass. Most folks don't understand that blue rug spreads at 6-8 feet at maturity. Overplanting creates lots of competition for moisture and nutrients and when planted in beds without this consideration sets the juniper bed up for failure.
 
  #5  
Old 02-14-09, 01:58 PM
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Thinning out the juniper bed?

Originally Posted by twelvepole View Post
Make sure you planted blue rug and not blue chip. Blue chip is beautiful but as it grows older the centers die out and turn brown and unsightly.

Phomopsis twig blight is a juniper problem. It is a fungal disease that causes small lesions on the twigs. When many branches become infected, the overall appearance is gray, ragged, and unsightly. Blight begins at the tips and can spread killing entire branches or plants.

Junipers are also primarily subject to rust, scale, mites and bag worms. In most commercial applications, whether creeping or upright, in front of restuarants, banks, and other buildings I see an enormous number of bag worms. Those folks appear to hire a landscape company to do plantings but seem to not know that plantings need maintenance and insect control.

Blue Rug juniper plants thrive in full sun and prefer well-drained soil with an acidic pH. Blue Rug is usually considered low maintenance. But, every home where there was blue rug juniper, I regularly lifted branches each spring and pruned when I did my spring cleaning in order to remove any debris, such as leaves, that got blown in and to allow light and air circulation in the thick mass. Most folks don't understand that blue rug spreads at 6-8 feet at maturity. Overplanting creates lots of competition for moisture and nutrients and when planted in beds without this consideration sets the juniper bed up for failure.
Could you correct the problems of an over-planted Blue Rug bed by digging out selected plants?
 
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