Flowering cherries - are they goners?

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  #1  
Old 06-02-05, 11:16 AM
romc
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Flowering cherries - are they goners?

I have 3 Prunus serrulata 'Amanogawa' flowering cherries, about 12 ft tall, in a row. Spring '04, as they were blooming & leaves just starting to come out, we had a bad windstorm which knocked all the blossoms off. No leaves came out on the top half. The branches grow almost straight up and close together, and I figured they had whipped each other & knocked off the buds. I braced them apart with bamboo & green twine. This year, they've bloomed (bottom half) and no leaves have come out on the top half. I've checked a few of the very ends of branches and they've snapped off, dead. Any clues on what, if anything, I can do?
 
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  #2  
Old 06-03-05, 08:01 PM
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Location: Taylors, SC
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By some fluke, it may be that these branches died. Possibly due to wind damage. Check the bark on the suspect branches. If it is firm and resist scraping with a fingernail or peels and shows green, it is alive. Otherwise, it is dead and should be removed in order to allow the tree to recover.

You might consider calling an arborist to check for you. Most large tree services employ one. Hope this helps.
 
  #3  
Old 06-04-05, 05:46 PM
romc
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Thank you

Thanks, Chris,

The cambium was green earlier this spring when I checked - same time I found the dead tips. I'll take a closer look now, see if there's any hope. And trim off the dead parts.

RomC
 
  #4  
Old 06-09-05, 07:30 PM
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Location: USA
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Fruit trees are susceptible to late frosts and other weather hazards. Harvest is unpredictable. Prune according to Dept. of Agriculture Extension Agent's recommendations and spray accordingly in your area. Cherries are sometimes produced, which are small and attract birds. A number of pests and diseases may attack cherries, so they are often considered relatively short-lived trees. In our climate, many species begin to decline after about 20 years. Twig or bark damage can occur during severe winters or rapid temperature changes. Cherries of all types need perfect drainage.
 
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