Country Stone Walk Maker

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  #1  
Old 01-29-06, 01:31 PM
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Country Stone Walk Maker

Hi all
I am wondering if anyone has tried this Quikrete item,
I have about 10' x 20' part of the yard I want to do.
I'm 50 + and last summer I built a 8 x 10 shed.
I guess I wud like to know if anyone has done this & how
much work it's going to be & tips if any.
dabear
 
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  #2  
Old 01-31-06, 01:26 PM
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Done it! I made an 80' walk to a 8'x8' pad. It took me and my wife all weekend and was back breaking work. The hardest part was mixing the concrete {my job}. And a lot of bags as well. My wife filled the form and continued to move it along. Needless to say we only made the walk one form wide. After several weeks we brushed mortar mix into the gaps and watered it down real well to lock all the cobles together. If you are looking for a rustic walkway it does really look good. The down side is if your ground is not flat, unless you shime the form the path will follow the ground.

We like it but it was a hard weekend 6 years ago.

Doug
 
  #3  
Old 01-31-06, 04:32 PM
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Well thanks doug, We are on the fence on this one. my concern is the spot is not level & what you said got me leaning, Our other option is black plastic & pea gravel, what we are is trying to keep our golden from digging holes, maybe this has to go to the pets section, well thanks again.
dabear
 
  #4  
Old 02-01-06, 05:15 AM
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Da Bear,

Your golden will dig in pea gravel and tear up the plastic. You would have to go a thicker heavier stone or use the gravel to level the area then put pavers on top.

Good luck,

Doug
 
  #5  
Old 02-01-06, 09:18 AM
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I'm actually about to start a similar project using the Pathmate forms and the companion ODJOB mixer.
http://www.scepter.com/gc/gc_catalog...K=Catalog&Z9=0

We expect to do our project over the course of several weekends to reduce the level of labor stress on aging bodies. We will be laying a path along the side of the house and across the front yard and are also planning on putting mortar mix into the joints. My goal: to NEVER weed the side of the house again.

The plan at the moment is to level the ground, put down weed barrier for stability, lay in a layer of pea gravel and possibly a layer of sand for leveling later. Then we will lay the concrete forms on top. (Subject to change as we go through the learning curve.)

If you are willing to wait about 2 weeks I will post back with a report on how well the mixer works and what we determined to be the ideal plan of execution.
 

Last edited by sashacat; 02-01-06 at 09:37 AM. Reason: added link
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Old 02-02-06, 09:59 AM
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Ok cool I've got a coulpe of months before we start so PLS let me know how it goes.
 
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Old 02-02-06, 10:22 AM
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I just went to the link you gave me & I liked the ODJOB mixer & like I said I have a couple months. Where did you get the mixer ?
dabear
 
  #8  
Old 02-02-06, 11:34 AM
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The best price I found was at www.sportsmansguide.com but I also used Froogle to check prices around the web.
http://froogle.google.com/

I find it hard to believe that the Odjob will mix a 60lb bag of concrete in 30 seconds, but I'll consider 1 minute to be acceptable
 
  #9  
Old 02-05-06, 01:49 PM
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Pathmate & Odjob instructions

We decided to do a small section that has been in need of some kind of treatment for a long time. Our usual project plan always includes figuring in a "learning curve" so this was no exception.

Sandy’s tips for the Pathmate and Odjob.

* Wear grungy clothes – this is a messy job.

* Wash the Odjob out between each bag. I know this is a pain in the ass, but the enough of the old stuff will stick to the insides to make it more difficult the longer you go before washing it out.

* If you are using colors, mix them very well in the water before you add in the concrete. If you don’t mix you can end up with gobs of color that didn’t fully mix in.

* A 60lb bag of concrete makes more than enough to fill each form, figure out what you are going to do with your extra before you start.

* If you are going to do a large area or are going to fill in the cracks with mortar mix, plan for your drainage. We were going up against the side of the house and slanted our forms slighly to run rainwater away from the foundation.

* One person can do this project, but it is easier with two. Don’t expect to go fast no matter how much help you have.

* Concrete is a lot of work, no matter how “easy” pictures or directions make it sound. We were damn tired after doing only 4 forms. Most things become easier after you get throught the learning curve and we expect this will too, but plan to take your time on the first 4 to 6 forms.

* Plan for your “learning curve”. Find a little noticed spot in the yard and put down a few test forms so that you aren’t learning on a spot that you will look at every day. This also allows you to play with colors to see what you like. We found that we needed less of the color than it stated on the bottle.

* The Odjob is not a perfect system. It does take closer to a full minute to get a good mix and it is tough to pour from since there are no handles on the sides (the only major design flaw that I’ve found. 60lbs of concrete really needs handles to pour...)

* Pour slowly out of the Odjob and try to cover the form instead of just dumping the whole thing in the middle. Use a trowel to push concrete into the corners of the stones and a floater to even out the top.

* We leveled our location, then put down weed barrier. Then we put down ˝” to ľ” of pea gravel. On top of that we put down a layer of sand to fill in the holes of the gravel and provide just enough on top to level the forms.

* My only real complaint is the limited instructions that came with both the Pathmate and Odjob. Both only barely covered the basics and frankly, left a whole lot out that would help a DIYer obtain better results (which is partly why I’m going into so much detail here.)
 
  #10  
Old 02-08-06, 11:06 AM
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Thank you for the info I think we are going to do this,
and after if my b***h dog digs anywhere else I'm going to throw a bag of redi-mix in & add water.
This was appreciated, thank you
dabear
 
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Old 02-09-06, 08:30 PM
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don't you guys have buy-the-yard trucks in your places ? you just buy whatever you may need the trucks mixes it at the exit it is not pre-mixed, it's very cheap ( about $70 a cubic yard , notice cubic not square ) and it'll save a lot of work, then you ask the guy to get a couple finishers and you'll have a professional piece of work, usually they have all the tools, just have to agree on their labor charge ( average $ 12/hour).
 
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Old 02-27-06, 08:48 PM
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Update:

After some procrastination, we finally got going on the "this is not a test" phase of our project.

Some additional notes on tools.....

I started this out using my little Toys-R-Us masory tools (read: junk tools) and have once again discovered that there is no substitute for the right tools. In this case, a $30 investment cut our finishing work in half.

The right tools for the job:

Pointing Trowel $4
Margin Trowel $4
Wood Hand Float $5
Aluminum Hand Float $13
(2) pairs heavy duty gloves $4 (the kind for stripping furniture)


Pictures coming in a few more weeks.
 
  #13  
Old 04-10-06, 08:52 AM
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This project took longer than anticipated (show me a home improvement project that doesn't!!)

Here are the finished photos:

What we started with -


Starting the project -


First section completed -


First section with mortar mix filling the joints -


Completed project -



Costs:

36 bags of concrete $155
1 roll weed barrier $16
7 bags of sand $14
7 bags of pea gravel $18
12 bottles concrete colorant $55
2 bags of mortar mix $10
Misc tools $30
Odjob Mixer $25
2 path molds $30

Total: $350
Never having to weed the side of the house again: PRICELESS!

Not everyone would need or want two molds, but we found it helpful for positioning and used the 2nd mold to make individual stones with the left over concrete from each batch. We also found that after a certain number of uses the concrete will start sticking to the insides of the molds and a quick blast of WD-40 make them almost good as new again.
 

Last edited by sashacat; 04-10-06 at 09:57 AM.
  #14  
Old 04-10-06, 04:48 PM
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"WOW" THAT LOOKS GREAT & way more than I want to do, thats a lot of work & money.
I don't think I am in any shape to do that.
But thanks for the pics & info.
dabear
 
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Old 05-22-06, 04:15 PM
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Adding a picture of the next phase of this project, which was a path across the (newly landscaped) front yard.

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f3.../frontPath.jpg

We found it easier to do the curves using the wider side of the mold. To make curves: notice on your forms there is a dotted line splitting the form into two sections, an "A" side and a "C" side (if using the mold in the shorter side you are looking for the "B" and "D" sides.)

To make a curve you will fill in only the individual stones inside of the dotted line. Then pull up your mold and turn it the opposite of the way your have been using it, so if you had been using the mold with the "A" side on the left, you will fill in the just the segments on the left side of the dotted line, then pull up the mold and turn it around so that the "C" side is now on your left.

This sounds confusing and I cannot recommend enough that you lay down sand and plot the whole thing out using the form before you mix any concrete, this way you know exactly where your curves are and how to create them before you are standing there scratching your head with 60lbs of concrete waiting.

One last piece of advice - feel free to adjust your stones once they are dry. We spread them out a little more and made the pathway considerably more natural looking by doing so. Having a good base of sand makes this much easier.
 

Last edited by sashacat; 05-22-06 at 09:16 PM.
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Old 05-24-06, 06:06 AM
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Outstanding

Sashacat, Very nice work, my compliments on both the project and the photography. Greensboro_man
 
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Old 05-25-06, 09:52 PM
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Awww. TY
 
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Old 04-22-07, 06:40 PM
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new question re: using pathmate/walkmaker forms

Hi Sashacat, I found this thread via Google and looked at the pics of your walkway project. Gorgeous work! We're considering putting in a fairly sizeable patio behind our house, and we've narrowed it down to either concrete identical to yours, or a 'ground level' wood deck.
I have a couple questions about the concrete form walkway you made that may help us decide which way to go.
First, now that it's about a year later, how is the walkway holding up? Are any of the stones breaking or cracking, or shifting position?
Second, approx. how many square feet is that walkway on the side of the house? (trying to estimate our own costs and project completion time frame)
Thanks!
 
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Old 04-22-07, 07:48 PM
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sorry not me

Hi you have to ask sachacat he is the one who did it & my dog is a couple yrs old & has gotten out of the digging business. Thank god.
Have a great day
db
 
  #20  
Old 04-24-07, 09:11 AM
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Greyhoundmom, the path has held up very well. The stones themselves are in great condition at one year old. I've had just a little bit of cracking of the mortar mix in the areas that I didn't do any re-positioning, the areas where I did a lot of repositioning due to complicated curves didn't hold up anywhere near as well. My mistake for not doing a better job at making sure the stones were re-set firmly when I moved them. The one thing I think I would do differently was brushing in mortar mix, wetting it and hoping it would hold. This really hasn't provided as strong a bond as I had hoped for. If I were doing this again, I would go back in and formally grout the areas in between the stones, which would be more work but likely hold up better in the long term, especially if you are doing a patio area that will take more abuse than my path. The side of the house is 36' long by 3' wide.

Here is a one-year later photo of the part that I did a better job with the repositioning on:
http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f3...mDesert044.jpg

And here is one of the area that I didn't do a good job with and consequently had all the mortar mix crack and fail.

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f3...mDesert045.jpg

I expect to need to go back and grout this area at some point....

Finally, this is how the front paths turned out with the lawn finally done:

http://i51.photobucket.com/albums/f3...f/house009.jpg
 
  #21  
Old 04-25-07, 09:10 PM
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concrete forms

Thanks! Your walkways look great. It looks like it is all holding up really well. I think we may just brush fine sand into the cracks between the stones when we do ours, or maybe try to grow some sort of short decorative ground cover plant. I'm just not up for that much mortaring, and I don't want to spend a fortune on a patio. I was sticker shocked when I got a quote on having a brick patio installed. I just want a flat place to put a picnic table and some chairs, not something that requires a second mortgage, y'know?
Thanks again!
 
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Old 04-27-07, 09:32 AM
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Thumbs up I did it!

Hi all - new here. Your experience and information that I found in this thread helped me build my new patio this year. Thanks to you all

I built a 12x14' patio with the Quickrete Walkmaker. It was easy as could be - barring the heavy lifting, which my husband helped me with - and I'm really happy with the results*. I also used the Walkmaker to put a matching surface layer of "stones" on my existing slab porch, so I ended up with a kind of two-level effect. I bordered the whole thing with a 16" garden strip, planted with herbs and flowers, with two "doors" through which to walk out into the yard (now I'm trying to train my dogs to use the doors, rather than vaulting over the plants or tumbling through them, hehe).

It took about eleven hours total (spread out over three weekends; including the time I spent removing grass and preparing the ground where the patio was going to go); and the total cost (the Walkmaker form, the concrete, mortar, and sand for the base) was about $170. I tried using garden tools and proper masonry tools to even out the stones as I went along; but I ended up just using my hands because it worked better (for me), and getting covered in wet concrete (yes, I had good gloves on). It was like playing with clay in art class as a kid. Hee!

*The only problem I've had has been with the mortar between the stones: I mixed my mortar with sand...except that I wasn't thinking: the mortar mix I bought already HAS sand in it, so adding more only weakened the mixture. My patio was beautiful the first several weeks, but the mortar is now cracking and crumbling in high-traffic places. I've been patching it here and there a little at a time, as cracks appear.

I'd post pictures, but like I said, I'm new, and I haven't figured out how to do that just yet. (Help?)

Again - thanks, you guys. Couldn't have done it without your advice.
 
  #23  
Old 03-12-09, 12:07 PM
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I hate to bring up old threads, but I think it's better than making new ones.

I'm thinking about doing this this coming Spring/Summer in my little back yard. As it is, my driveway is very small, and my truck is tearing up the lawn 1'-2' past the edge of the driveway. My intentions are to line the edge of the driveway with pavers/patio block to help clean it up a bit, then make a patio with these "stones". My question is, how much damage do you think I'm looking at doing by driving on this (not much, maybe 1' along the edge).

Is there something I should consider doing as a base layer that would help support the blocks and cut down on the amount of damage I'd do?
 
  #24  
Old 03-12-09, 12:38 PM
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The concrete "walk makers" won't stand up to being driven on, unless you do a base below them just like you would if you were doing a paver driveway. Even then, sometimes they get a "web" of cement between the stones which would crack and probably cause shifting. If you have to go to all that work, I'd just use driveway pavers for all the area that might be driven on.

They will work fine for the patio or a path...we did probably several hundred sq ft at our old house using the cobblestone (?) pattern. You will need more than one form or you will be very time restricted by waiting for the concrete to set up.
 
  #25  
Old 03-12-09, 04:28 PM
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Camper, you might want to consider something like one of these.
http://www.invisiblestructures.com/GV2/gravelpave.htm

They even have one for turf, beaches, etc. Here's the one for turf.
http://www.invisiblestructures.com/GP2/grasspave.htm

Here's another company that has one for turf.
http://www.permaturf.com/default.htm

Newt
 
  #26  
Old 03-12-09, 05:38 PM
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Country Stone Walk Maker

If you look at the individual plastic or invisible systems, they all require either sand and gravel or an engineered compacted base depending on what you are going to drive over them with. - They are just a surface that depends on the right material under it to support the load.

Dick
 
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Old 03-12-09, 06:19 PM
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Dick, that's an excellent point I probably should have mentioned. In my mind the advantage would be a finished looking surface with either turf or gravel that doesn't migrate.

Newt
 
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