Bamboo Project - Not Sure Which Way to Go.


  #1  
Old 03-22-06, 05:29 PM
Bubba Bob
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Bamboo Project - Not Sure Which Way to Go.

Ok, here's the deal. The persons that owned this house before me started a bamboo grove behind the
back fence to keep out "the other neighboorhood". Over the years the bamboo has spread, and vines and other crap has grown in with it. Now it just looks like one big mess. Behind this bamboo grove my property extends for another 100ft. What I am wanting to do is either a) transplant some bamboo and start a new grove at the end of the 100ft, b) plant new bamboo back there.

From what Ive read it's too late in the season to transplant bamboo. Can transplanting be done if it's starting to shoot again?


FOr plan B, what is the cheapist route to go? Is there such a thing as a bamboo seed, or do I have to shell out big bucks for a plant?

Thanks,
Bob
 
  #2  
Old 03-22-06, 07:20 PM
T
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If you wait long enough the bamboo will take over all your property. It is a very invasive grass. You can transplant by digging up a clump. Digging up a 2' clump and a large root ball is difficult. Transplant in fall when growing season is past. Never transplant when shooting. You can contain bamboo with a barrier of 3" concrete or a trench filled with gravel. Leave a couple inches of barrier above ground so you can cut roots that want to climb over. You can also knock over new shoots along border of bamboo to keep it contained.

You can check with local specialty nurseries that carry bamboo to see if any of their bamboo has produced seeds and online for bamboo seeds. Bamboo blooms infrequently so seeds tend to be difficult to acquire.

To clean up existing bamboo thicket, would require your cutting it down or thinning to where canes are about 2 feet or more apart to make room for new shoots in spring. Remove the small canes and leave the large ones. Older, large canes producing yellow leaves should be removed. You will also want to remove damaged, weak, and dead canes along with weeds and debris in the grove. Cutting lower branches reduces chances of infestation from bamboo mite.
 
  #3  
Old 03-22-06, 08:01 PM
Bubba Bob
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Thanks for the reply.

I have another question now. I looked on ebay and they have seeds for cheap.

If I plant bamboo seeds this year, will they begin to multiply next year or deos it take a few years?

Also, what would a good type of bamboo be for forming a fence?

Thanks
 
  #4  
Old 03-22-06, 08:24 PM
T
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You will have to do a little research on the different types of bamboo. Some bamboos are best for screens while others are ideal for specimen or display plants. Although most are very cold hardy you will need an extra cold hardy species if you live in a cold climate. A bamboo specialist would be able to identify the type of bamboo you need for fencing.

Seeds take several months to get to a few inches high, and several years to make a good plant. Plant seeds ASAP or put in refrigerator until conditions allow. Plant seeds in spring for best results. You can germinate seeds on windowsill. Germination rate can be from low to as much as 80%. If several types of bamboo bloomed and produced seed at the same time you may end up with a not so good hybrid of the type you wanted.

There's running bamboo and clumping bamboo. Running bamboo gets out of control as it spreads. Clumping bamboo does not spread as rapidly although it does send out runners 6-12 feet. I would contact a reputable bamboo seed supplier and discuss what you want to do and get a recommendation for type of seed. Purchasing seeds from a reputable nursery would offer greater chances of success of germination due to age and quality of seeds. Remember germination rates tend to be low. I would be hesitant to purchase seeds on ebay without know more about the age, kind, and quality of the seeds.

Since you have so much bamboo available to you might want to reconsider transplanting although it is hard work. That is, if you like that particular type of bamboo.

You may like to read and contact the American Bamboo Society at http://www.americanbamboo.org/Genera...hartIntro.html
 
  #5  
Old 03-23-06, 06:22 AM
Bubba Bob
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Seeds take several months to get to a few inches high, and several years to make a good plant.
Ouch.

Ok, I guess Ill wait till fall and try and transplant.

Thanks for the advice
 
  #6  
Old 04-10-06, 09:06 AM
S
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Having removed a large clump of bamboo a few years ago, let me give you some advice....

First, there are two primary types of bamboo: Running and Clumping.

Running bamboo is your worst nightmare as it is next to impossible to get rid of once it gets going. It pretty much needs expensive professional removal.

Clumping bamboo is slightly easier to contain, but it will clamber over darn near anything in it's path to expand.

Not knowing how your yard and neighborhood is, one thing I would caution is that you might be held responsible for bamboo that decides to expand into other yards or areas, so keep that in mind. You can control bamboo a little bit with deep concrete bunkers along the sides of the planters, but there is no guarantee that will stop it. The stuff behind my house was of the clumping variety and it plowed right through concrete blocks and destroyed my back fence. It was headed for my neighbor's shed when we started hacking it out. Took us maybe 6 weeks to get rid of it all and we ended up excavating a hole 10' x 10' and maybe 3' deep.
 
 

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