Clearing bramble from wooded yard


  #1  
Old 03-29-06, 07:39 AM
D
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Clearing bramble from wooded yard

Most of my backyard is woods, many tall trees, a few small ones and alot of bramble. I would like to make a portion of this usable without having to worry about ticks (and limes disease). I started clearing out some bramble, simply using a brushcutter attachment on my weedwacker, and then raking/mowing up the leaves and twigs. I am left with a layer of which I think is pete. It is black and has many roots growing laterally.

My question is can I just put down a thick layer of mulch, let's say pine bark or cedar bark nuggets, without having to worry about the bramble growing back through? This way I will still have a natural look in the backyard. Another option is to seed the area, which I would then haul in a few truckloads of topsoil to spread over the area before seeding. Again, will the bramble find its way throught the topsoil and new grass?

My wife insists we "rip out" all the bramble, but to do this by hand will take weeks. The area is roughly 30 feet by 40 feet, and will most likely be expanded. Entire wooded area is now aprox. 250 ft by 100ft. I have thought about renting one of those cats (plow on front and ditch digger claw on back) from home depot for a weekend and just rip everything up, but not sure if the $200/day or so is a good deal or if I even need to do all that.

Thanks!

Dave
 
  #2  
Old 04-03-06, 09:37 AM
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Sometimes the simple way is the best way

If I were you I would go with the simple plan you mentioned first. I would cover the area you have cleaned out with a 3 or 4inch layer of what ever mulch is locally available. I think keeping this heavily wooded area in a more natural state will be both practical and attractive.

It is a practical certainty that you will have sprouts popping up all over the place. They would be a simple matter to deal with if you dedicated some time with your brush cutting blade equipped weedeater. Periodically make a pass over the mulched area with your machine chopping out the sprouts as they develope. As you do this over time the problem will diminish.

There are some foliage destroying sprays available but they may not be available in a heavily regulated state. They are the chemical equivilant of burning the sprouts with one of those propane weed burner devises.

Checking with your local agricultural agent will inform you of what is allowed in your area. They are very knowlegeable and helpful people in my experience.

In similar situations we will do the mulch thing first and then when fall leaf fall comes along we let the leaves fall and the leaf cover becomes the natural mulch which is free and looks totally appropriate in a heavily wooded setting.

Best of luck with your project...38 years in the business and still learning.... Greensboro_man
 
  #3  
Old 04-03-06, 02:39 PM
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I appreciate your comments. If I let the leaves fall naturally, this will bring back the tick problem since deer and mice are in the area and leaf litter is a great attraction for ticks.

I guees I could just blow the leaves when they fall and leave the mulch. If the mulch/ nuggets are heavy enough, the blower shouldn't disturb them too much.
 
  #4  
Old 04-03-06, 03:11 PM
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Best mulch to use

Sorry, here in central North Carolina we don't have the tick problem in leaves that it appears you guys have. If you have available any of the shredded type mulches as opposed to the nugget types they may be more suitable for your situation.

Especially when damp they would resist movement when you are blowing your leaves. In any case with whatever type mulch you chose careful use of your blower should clear the leaves away nicely. I would try to get them off before they got too thick as this too would minimize mulch loss.

Best of luck..Greensboro_man
 

Last edited by greensboro_man; 04-05-06 at 01:13 AM.
  #5  
Old 04-04-06, 12:23 PM
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After a few years of keeping sprouts down with weedeater, you will find that fewer and fewer plants tend to send up shoots. You can selectively treat sprouts with brush and brush killer for woody stem plants. 3-4" of mulch will help keep out weeds.
 
 

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