Oak Trees

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  #1  
Old 05-27-06, 01:16 PM
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Oak Trees

I have a couple of Oak trees that are over 20 years old in my back yard here in San Antonio, Tx. Every year they shed their leafs around March, which they did a couple of months back, but now they are shedding again from the ground up and I don't see any new leafs budding. We are having a prolong drought here in S.A. and I was wondering if it could be the cause of it. Appreciate your comments.
 
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  #2  
Old 06-01-06, 09:53 AM
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  #3  
Old 06-01-06, 02:30 PM
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Drought stresses trees and they will tend to shut down and lose leaves to conserve resources. When water resources are scarce, a tree diverts available water to the leaves so it can maintain a healthy crown, so you will see dropping of lower leaves.

Normally an established tree can recover from a dry season. If, however, it is forced into dropping leaves two or three years in a row then the stress may be more than it can handle. No amount of rain or watering will bring it back to to life.

Trees weakened from drought stress tend to be more susceptible to insects and disease. You will need to keep an eye on your trees.
 
  #4  
Old 06-17-06, 09:21 AM
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Oak Trees

Thanks to Newt and Twelvepole for your valuable information. You guys are a great help. Thanks
 
  #5  
Old 06-17-06, 09:38 AM
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Pookey, you are very welcome! Were you able to figure out what the problem is?

Newt
 
  #6  
Old 06-28-06, 10:21 AM
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Hello all,

I just recently purchased some land in Northern Alabama. Most of the trees on my property is hard woods. The previous owner who sold me the property said most of the hard woods are red, black, and white oak. Does know how I can identify which type they are or even if they are oak trees? Any links or pictures would be great.

Also, do all oak trees have pretruding bark. A lot of the trees have very rough pretruding bark and some of the trees on my property have corse but flat surfaces. Can both types of trees be oak trees?

Boomer2
 
  #7  
Old 06-28-06, 12:38 PM
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Hi Boomer,

Congratulations on your purchase!! Here's some sites that should be helpful. The first is for red, white and black (sometimes called yellow) oaks.
http://www-unix.oit.umass.edu/~ecboss/oak.html

This site is about growing them from seed, but has good sketches of the different leaves with info you can print out.
http://osuextra.com/pdfs/F-5031web.pdf

This is a Missouri site but has some good descriptive info on several native oaks.
http://www.grownative.org/index.cfm?...hichName=genus

Lots to look at here but might be handy for shrubs too.
Trees of Alabama and the Southeast:
http://www.forestry.auburn.edu/samuelson/dendrology/

Often it's easier to id a tree by it's seeds. In the case of the oaks it's the acorns. This site is from Virginia but has some good sketches.
http://www.victorianvilla.com/sims-m...rees/index.htm

At this site you don't have to fill in all the info, just search with your state and get a list of trees and more info about them.
http://www.fw.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/factsheets.cfm

These search engines might help with other trees as well. Some are easier to use then others.
http://www.arborday.org/trees/treeid.cfm
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/keys/trees/keyhelp.htm

With this site you can search by association. For example, once you id a particular tree, see if it's listed here. Click on it and the next page will give you a list of other plants and trees that can generally be found in the same area. Just scroll down . It also lists animals associated with your target plant that use it as food or shelter as well as some pests.
http://www.fcps.k12.va.us/StratfordL...anism_menu.htm

Oh, and different trees of the same species will have different types of bark, even different coloration. Their seeds and the buds will also be different. This site is in Spanish, but it has pics of bark, seed, flowers, etc of different trees. Click on 'Tallo' (trunk or stem) on the right. Then scroll down and click on page 8 at the bottom. You will find several pics of different Quercus - oak bark. If you would like a translator for the different words I can find you one.
http://www.arbolesornamentales.com/elarbol.htm

If you don't know the botanical (Latin) name of a tree you can search at google with the common name and get the botanical one. Then use that to search more. Of course a field guide could also be helpful. Consider contacting your local extension service for help as well. If it's a large tract of land they can lead you to your local Dept. of Forestry or Natural Resources to help advise on how to proceed with management. and probably id native as well as invasive species for you. Definately click on 'Environment and Natural Resources' at this site.
http://www.aces.edu/

Enjoy!
Newt
 
  #8  
Old 06-28-06, 02:35 PM
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Newt,

Thank you for the links. It was exactly what I was looking for. I added them to my favorites as they will help out tremendously.

I am posting a link on soil. Maybe you can help.

Boomer
 
  #9  
Old 06-28-06, 02:44 PM
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Types of soils

sorry - deleted to put in new thread
 
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