poison ivy assistance

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  #1  
Old 07-22-06, 12:06 PM
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Location: Baltimore, MD
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poison ivy assistance

Hello,

I have a good amount of poison ivy growing along the forest line of my yard and under a few of my larger shrub beds.

I have am very allergic to it (i look it it and i get it) though don't require medical attention when I get it.

I also have a 5 month old that will be running around the yard in the not to distant future.

What can I do to control or kill off this nemsis? I live outside of Baltimore.

Thanks..
 
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  #2  
Old 07-23-06, 07:02 AM
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Like you I am very sensitive to poison ivy. I've got some itchy spots just from reading your post.

Herbicies that contain glyophosphate (Round-Up, Glyphos...) work very well on poison ivey. I like Glyphos brand because it is cheaper but it is only sold in larger containers of concentrate which are good if you have a large estate or farm. Round-up (you don't need the ultra version) is available everywhere but is more expensive. The herbicide is only absorbed through leaves so if you accidently spray a tree trunk it will do no harm.

I would just stand back and spray the poison ivey and let it die. The oils will naturally dry up and decompose rendering it harmless.
 
  #3  
Old 07-23-06, 03:07 PM
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Location: Maryland zone 7
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Hi SHW,

I feel your pain, or should I say itch! I used to be immune to it and found out the hard way that isn't the case anymore. Here's more helpful info, including how to protect yourself.
http://www.marrick.com/poison_ivy_removal.html
http://res2.agr.gc.ca/ecorc/poison/eradic_e.htm

Here's how to recognize it in different stages of growth and some of it's look-alikes.
http://res2.agr.gc.ca/ecorc/poison/radicans_e.htm
http://www.naturenorth.com/summer/pivy/pivy2.html
http://res2.agr.gc.ca/ecorc/poison/index_e.htm

Newt
 
  #4  
Old 07-23-06, 10:40 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 98
Originally Posted by Pilot Dane
Like you I am very sensitive to poison ivy. I've got some itchy spots just from reading your post.

Herbicies that contain glyophosphate (Round-Up, Glyphos...) work very well on poison ivey. I like Glyphos brand because it is cheaper but it is only sold in larger containers of concentrate which are good if you have a large estate or farm. Round-up (you don't need the ultra version) is available everywhere but is more expensive. The herbicide is only absorbed through leaves so if you accidently spray a tree trunk it will do no harm.

I would just stand back and spray the poison ivey and let it die. The oils will naturally dry up and decompose rendering it harmless.
One point to remember... Poison ivy is much more difficult to kill as it hardens off later in its' growing season, namely now. It usually requires multiple sprayings with the Round up type products to finish it off at this time of year. A small tank type pump up garden sprayer works well. A dew like mist covering the foliage works best. A heavier application breaks the surface tension and allows the product to run off the leaf. Any that runs off is totally wasted.

If it is growing among desireable plants you will have to be very careful to spray only the poison ivy foliage. If you don't have to worry about hitting desireable foliage or grass you can adjust your spray nozzle to a straight stream and wet the P. Ivy foliage from some distance away as you are so allergic. Should you make a mistake and get some spray where you didn't mean to just quickly and throughly hose down that area and the round up will be washed off the good plant and no damage will be done.

Remember, Round up works only when it is absorbed by green foliage. Use the highest rate (oz. per gallon of water) that the label allows and spray it at about 2 week intervals until it's toast.

Best of luck with your project,38 years in the business and still learning... Greensboro_man
 
  #5  
Old 07-26-06, 07:57 PM
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Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
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Thumbs up

I had a bout with poison ivy last year to the extent of being hospitalized for nine days, due to both inhaling and external. I
eventually went into anaphylaxic shock, while in hospital. I now carry an epi pen while outdoors. I got this though weeding around my clematis thus not realizing that it was growing along with the plant. Upon coming home I called my local health unit who in return referred me to the local ministry of agriculture, they came to positivley identify. I was told to purchase round up, not the kind from walmart, however from a farm supply or if you know a farmer who will sell you some its cheaper. He advised me to not once, twice but three times to spray the plant to make sure it died. I lost some perennials but due to the severity of the reaction I cant take the chance. Poison Ivy has rizome roots that spread along the ground then seem to pop up from no where. Even though mine was contained to a 2ft section I sprayed a 4ft section to make sure that I got it all, then in the fall making sure there was no sign of greenery I saturated the soil with another 3rd doze. So far so good no signs of it this year. Good Luck!
 
  #6  
Old 07-27-06, 11:17 AM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 98
Round up application

I am very sorry that you had to endure such a terrible and potentially fatal alergic reaction to poison ivy.

So that there will be no confusion regarding round up application, I will point out that round up has no soil activity. Meaning that it is only effective as a weed/grass killer when absorbed by the green foliage of the target plant. spray it on the trunk, spray it on the ground/root area...no effect. This is its' defining quality, the quality that seperated it from all weed killers that came before it.

Its' absortion into the plant by foliar means only is its' claim to fame. If it would kill plants by contact with their root systems it would be entirely useless to use as a selective weed/grass killer among other desireable plants because it would kill them also as their root systems are intertwined.

I agree, as I stated in my previous post, that repeat applications of round up are usually necessary to kill off poison ivy especially later in the growing season when the plant has become tougher to kill. But these applications must be to the poison ivys' foliage.

Again I wish you the best (and safe) gardening, 38 years in the business and still learning...Greensboro_man
 
  #7  
Old 07-27-06, 02:24 PM
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Hi Gmcladee,

I too am sorry to hear of your problems with poison ivy. Hopefully those links I posted for SHW will be of some help to you in the future.


Hi Greensboro Man,

I will point out that round up has no soil activity. Meaning that it is only effective as a weed/grass killer when absorbed by the green foliage of the target plant. spray it on the trunk, spray it on the ground/root area...no effect.
I would like to point out some recent research that you may not be aware of done by the Danish.
http://www.pan-uk.org/pestnews/Actives/glyphosate2.htm

Environmental fate and ecological impact of glyphosate


In formulated products POEAs were found to be more toxic than other surfactants and – when used according to label recommendations under normal use conditions – could be lethal to bluegill sunfish in very shallow water (less than 10 cm depth)(48). Exposure of tadpoles to low concentrations of glyphosate formulation for a short time revealed sublethal effects and led to significant mortality(49). Indirect effects of cereal herbicides including glyphosate are associated with the decline of 11 bird species in the UK(50).
Degradation of glyphosate in soil was found to be slow(51). A study in Denmark has found that: ‘glyphosate, when applied in late autumn, can leach through the root zone [1m below ground soil] at unacceptable concentrations in loamy soil’; average concentrations exceeded the European Drinking Water Standard (0.1 µg/l) at two sites for glyphosate, and at one for aminoethylphosphonic acid, a degradation product detected over one and a half years after application(52). The Danish government has proposed to restrict the use of glyphosate, preventing its use during the autumn and winter on clay soils where the risk of leaching is high within heavy rainfall. The restriction is due to come into force in 2004.
Conclusion

It is often argued that glyphosate is an alternative to the use of herbicides with higher acute toxicities, such as 2,4-D or paraquat. However, there exists sufficient evidence that glyphosate can cause harmful chronic effects to health, and the Danish study on surface waters revealed an unforeseen way of behaviour in the environment. The use of glyphosate should be reduced substantially, especially in developing countries, to minimise acute and chronic effects on wildlife and human health.
From the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) from Monsanto:
http://www.mindfully.org/Pesticide/M...SDS25jan01.htm

Dissipation
Soil, field:

Half life: 2 - 174 days
Koc: 884 - 60,000 L/kg
Binds strongly to soil.
Newt
 
  #8  
Old 07-27-06, 02:54 PM
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: united states
Posts: 98
Reserch, round up.

Newt ( my favorite poster )

This important research tends to support my urging gardeners to use this product sparingly. There is a tendency for folks to think if a little is good alot is better. With round up it is precisely the opposite. If the product is applied correctly meaning a dew like mist is applied to the foliage only then the absolute minimum of the product will be introduced to the environment.

Referring to clay it is counter intuitive to say its' leaching capability is high as it is used to line toxic landfills to help prevent that very situation.

My main point is using the product correctly (very small net amount) is a win win situation as that method it is more effective and uses less product.

When I reffered to " pouring it the ground " that was to explain that type of application would not kill the poison ivy plant certainly not to encourage that practice.

I hope that clears up any misunderstanding.

Respectful regards, Greensboro_man
 
  #9  
Old 07-27-06, 10:58 PM
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Greensboro Man,

I'm glad you found that useful. We value the info you share and it's always a pleasure. I do hope you now understand that Gylphosate does have activity in the soil by moving into the water table. I was surprised when I read that too.

Newt
 
  #10  
Old 07-29-06, 01:26 PM
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Location: Southern Ontario, Canada
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Just to clarify

Thanks to you both for your replies and advice. Maybe I didnt clarify myself fully. The poison ivy came in a truck load of wood chips from our local municipal composting site. It was a small contained area. A Canadian ministry of agriculture rep who is also a personal friend, came to my home and clarified that it was indeed poison ivy. The inspector then instructed me on the correct mixture ammount, and supervised me the first time in spraying the area. He could not tell me what to spray but I already had round up available.Then to re spray at about three week intervals to make sure that any new growth was also hit. I live rural, next to farm land that is constantly spayed with different sprays throughout the growing season. We do however have municipal water that is brought via water line from the nearest city. To clarify...the ground was not saturated, I was told to let the area sit for one growing season, then turn over the soil and respray once more thus exposing anything that may have been missed in the inital spray.
Thanks for your concerns
 
  #11  
Old 07-29-06, 04:59 PM
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Poison ivy is difficult to control, even with herbicides. Should you purchase a herbicide, make sure the label states that it is for poison ivy control. If poison ivy is located in flower beds, paint leaves with herbicide in order to avoid damage to plants. Because poison ivy is a woody-stemmed plant, brush killer tends to be more effective than Roundup. Roundup may kill leaves, but roots may not be affected without multiple applications. Wear protective clothing and gloves when applying herbicide to poison ivy. Remove clothing immediately and toss in washer when finished. Keep children away from areas where there is poison ivy until it has been eradicated. Be ever vigilant for new sprouts.
 
  #12  
Old 07-29-06, 06:05 PM
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Gmcladee, thank you for clarifying that to us.

Newt
 
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