Should I get the tree stump ground out?

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Old 07-27-06, 09:18 PM
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Should I get the tree stump ground out?

I am having a tree company remove a 30' silver maple that hangs over my glassed in porch... This tree is very close to the cinderblock foundation of the porch ~ 9 inches. I have no idea why this tree is so close - my guess is that the tree was already established when the porch was added on. Anyway, the tree company is quoting me a separate price to have the stump ground out, but with it this close to the foundation, I was wondering if it was a good idea? Are there any other options for stump removal?
 
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Old 07-27-06, 10:00 PM
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To grind or not to grind

If you will make sure that your tree service makes its' final cut FLUSH with the ground then the stump wont be obtrusive and you can just let it slowly decay. Being that close to the structure I see no compelling reason to spend the extra money grinding the stump.

A simple procedure will speed up the process of decay. Have the tree company cut a series of plunge cuts in the stump. This will cause rain water to stand in those slots speeding up decay.

Best of luck with your project, 38 years in the business and still learning... Greensboro_man
 
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Old 07-27-06, 10:14 PM
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You can expedite stump decay by pouring 'stump rot' into cuts into stump immediately after cutting tree.
 
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Old 07-28-06, 12:04 AM
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You could also drill deep holes into the stump. Fill holes or cuts with sugar, molasses, syrup, old jellies, jams, candies, buttermilk, or fertilizer of any kind. The idea is to get decomposition started. Now wet it down so it's moist and apply a thick layer of mulch. Some trees take longer to decompose then others.

Newt
 
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Old 07-30-06, 07:09 AM
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You might need to treat the fresh cut with a brush killing herbicide since maples usually will resprout from the stumps.
 
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Old 08-08-06, 08:05 PM
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I'm wondering if it might be worth it to take the stump out. If you ever plan on selling the house, it's the kind of thing that an inspector would notice -- they've got eagle eyes for anything that would bring down the cost for a buyer. If this doesn't factor into your equation, you'll have to keep an eye out for sprouts coming up from the stump, so you can hack away at them before they become big.
 
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Old 08-10-06, 05:54 PM
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It depends on what the tree company is going to charge for stump grinding.
The previous owner of our house had 5 spruce and one oak tree cut and left the stumps about 5" above ground level with dirt mounded to cover them.
I rented a stump grinder last spring for a weekend ($130 here) and ground all 6 stumps to about 1 1/2' below ground and backfilled.
But because the oak was right at the sidewalk I could only get within about 3" of it then used an axe for the remaining and that was the hardest part of the job.
The bonus was having all those wood chips to use as mulch in the gardens after the job was done.

Regards
 
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Old 08-10-06, 10:45 PM
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Hi WGW,

How wonderful that you could do that. I don't think my back could take it. Don't forget to let those wood chips age for 6 months or so before you place them in your garden on top of roots.

Newt
 
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Old 08-11-06, 08:43 PM
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"Don't forget to let those wood chips age for 6 months or so before you place them in your garden on top of roots."
Newt

Whoops...I did'nt know that and put em straight into the gardens. It does'nt seem to have had any negative effects though.
Why should they be aged first?
 
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Old 08-11-06, 09:44 PM
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WGW, Whoops is right. From this site:
http://www.dispatch.com/garden/garde...22-I13-01.html

A couple of gardeners who mulched with fresh wood chips from recently removed trees found out the hard way that this causes problems.

The mulched plants turned light green or yellowish as they became starved for nitrogen. Why?

Chipped wood and sawdust typically are high in carbon and low in nitrogen. The microorganisms that decompose the wood use soil nitrogen to break down the wood chips, further reducing the supply available for plant growth.

The best way to avoid the yellowing is to compost the wood chips with added nitrogen to lower the carbon-to-nitrogen ratio. Mixing grass clippings with woody wastes is one way to do this. Another is to add a quick-release source of nitrogen, such as urea, to supply 1ľ pounds of actual nitrogen for each cubic yard of wood chips.

If using urea, which has an analysis of 46-0-0, you would need to add about 2Ĺ pounds of it for every cubic yard of wood chips to reach the desired level of nitrogen.

Other high-nitrogen fertilizers also could be used. Compost for at least six weeks; turn the pile occasionally and water if it gets dry. This produces a nitrified mulch that releases plant nutrients rather than consuming them.
More info on fresh wood chips.
http://www.ext.vt.edu/departments/en.../jan94pra.html

In your case the stumps may have been aging long enough to not cause that much of a problem. Watch your plants closely for signs of yellowing or stress.

This site lists the % of Nitrogen and other goodies in fertilizers. You might want to hold on to it.
http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/depts/hort/c...ng_tables.html

Newt
 
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Old 08-12-06, 09:44 AM
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Thanks for all the good tips. I decided not to have the stump ground out since Iím sure that the roots are right up against the foundation of the porch. I was afraid that the vibration would translate directly to the foundation wall. They didnít cut the stump flush with the ground Ė thereís about 4 inches above Ė but I will drill holes and put in salt to try and speed up the decay. (I am assuming that I can always get the stump removed at a later date when it has decayed a bit and might be softer.)
 
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Old 08-12-06, 10:24 AM
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Schlitten, not sure why you would use salt. You need sugars to get the microbes working. The salt will kill the microbes and won't do much to aid the decomposition.

Newt
 
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