Majesty palm height?

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  #1  
Old 08-04-06, 04:41 PM
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Majesty palm height?

I have a majesty palm that is about 4 feet in height. What is the growth rate on that type of palm. Also, i am going to plant it in the front yard with full sun. Will this be alright.
 
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  #2  
Old 08-04-06, 05:23 PM
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They actually prefer full sun so that would be perfect. They will require a lot of water depending on what type of soil you have. The more you water the faster the growth.

The growth rate is fast to 10' then slowing.
 
  #3  
Old 08-04-06, 06:08 PM
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That will be perfect for in front of the house,thanks for the info.
 
  #4  
Old 08-04-06, 06:19 PM
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Make sure you choose that special spot in the front yard. I recently watched an HGTV episode where they were 'flipping a house' for sale. Part of their landscaping improvements was to move the palm from the center of the front lawn over to the left out of the front, so that it more or less offered a frame for the house when you looked at it. It also opened up the front yard and made it seem larger.

Stand back from the front of your house at the curb or edge of the lawn and pretend you are looking at your house in a picture frame. Then, determine where the tree should go to enhance framing of your home. If you have a digital camera, this can help as you view your home in a frame. Ideally, trees should frame the view of your home, not block it.
 
  #5  
Old 08-05-06, 08:09 AM
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Framing vs. hiding

Originally Posted by twelvepole
Make sure you choose that special spot in the front yard. I recently watched an HGTV episode where they were 'flipping a house' for sale. Part of their landscaping improvements was to move the palm from the center of the front lawn over to the left out of the front, so that it more or less offered a frame for the house when you looked at it. It also opened up the front yard and made it seem larger.

Stand back from the front of your house at the curb or edge of the lawn and pretend you are looking at your house in a picture frame. Then, determine where the tree should go to enhance framing of your home. If you have a digital camera, this can help as you view your home in a frame. Ideally, trees should frame the view of your home, not block it.
I wholeheartedly agree with twelvepoles' advice regarding tree placement in your front yard. There seems to be a universal tendency to plant 2 trees dead in front of many homes. As twelvepole described this means as the trees grow and mature they will tend to obliterate the view of your home. Placement off to the left or right of the front corners of your home is what i'm suggesting. In that general area would be many options, my suggestion would be to consider a spot a few feet forward of your home but off to the side.

Another way to help visualize potential planting locations is to have a family member or friend stand where you think the tree should go. You can then have them move around till you get it just right.

Carefully consider the mature size and shape of your tree and location of any other trees nearby when making your final decision.

Best of luck with your project, 38 years in the business and still learning...Greensboro_man
 
  #6  
Old 08-07-06, 01:49 PM
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Thanks for the help guys.

I picked a spot and palnted the majesty yesterday. however, I went outside this morning and it looks as if the palms are turning a yellowish color. After planting I added palm fert. and some liquid starter fert.

Is there anything else i can do to make sure the majesty stays green and healthy.

Thanks in advance for the help.
 
  #7  
Old 08-07-06, 02:15 PM
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It is probably in shock. They love water so make sure it is well watered. It will take some time for it to recover.
 
  #8  
Old 08-07-06, 04:18 PM
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Thanks for the help. Can it be over fertalized?
 
  #9  
Old 08-07-06, 07:37 PM
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Hmmmm...what makes you think you overfertilized?

I hope this will help you

http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvic...zing-palms.htm

In the meanwhile, keep watering (not flooding) until it is well established. Give it some time...
 

Last edited by DIYaddict; 08-08-06 at 06:54 AM. Reason: more info
  #10  
Old 08-08-06, 04:47 PM
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Should i give it a good watering everyday. I was thinking about a galloon a day or is that too much. i've read they like a lot of water.
 
  #11  
Old 08-09-06, 06:19 AM
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Yes, I would give it good watering everyday until it is established. Make sure it stays moist and not soggy. It does love water
 
  #12  
Old 08-10-06, 04:44 PM
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I have been watering the majesty at least a galloon a day and about half of the leaves are brown, when it gets throught transfer shock will these turn around and look healthy again?
 
  #13  
Old 08-10-06, 09:34 PM
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Majesty palms can be tricky. Unfortunately you don't say where you live and what type of soil the palm is planted in.

If planted in full sun when they were shaded before in a pot, they will quickly yellow. Palms should NEVER be fertilized when planted. It's best to wait 4 to 6 weeks or more before fertilizing. Even though these palms like lots of water, they don't like to sit in water. A gallon of water a day sounds like a bit much to me. Check to see that the soil isn't saturated but just moist. It could take a year or more for it to recover so don't get discouraged. Here's some highlights from sites about these palms and transplanting palms in general.

From the site that DIY Addict gave you.
http://www.junglemusic.net/palmadvic...zing-palms.htm

Don’t fertilize immediately when planting palm trees. Wait about 4 to 6 weeks after planting when you’re sure adequate soil water content is achieved and risk of “transplant shock” has passed.
From this site:
http://mgonline.com/majestypalm.html

They are said to be adaptable to most soils, like their soil a little wet, must be watered faithfully during dry spells and prefer a good dose of sun or partial shade

One thing for sure is they are fussy for food and demand proper fertilization or they turn yellow fast. As with any underfed palm, recovery is often slow, sometimes two years, so feed Majesty Palm 6X a year with palm food
From this site so you can check how you planted:
http://www.palmgrower.com/planting_palms.htm

Palms can be planted throughout the year, but the best time is during warm weather, when root growth is most active. This generally includes the period from April through September. The preferred time is late spring and early summer.

A fertile, well-drained soil will promote luxuriant growth. Dig the planting hole as large as practical. In areas of caliche, a planting hole five feet wide and five feet deep is not too large for the bigger species. If necessary, dig a drainage chimney down to a porous strata to permit excess irrigation water to drain from the planting hole.

Add 1/4 to 1/3 organic matter by volume to the soil which is put back around the palm. This may be wood residue products, peat moss or well-rotted manure. Do not use large amounts of manure unless you can prepare the planting area several weeks in advance and irrigate thoroughly to leach out excess salts. In any case, thoroughly mix organic matter with backfill soil to be used in the planting hole.

Small container-grown palms are set out so that the top of the root ball is 1/4" to ˝" below ground level. Water thoroughly at planting time. Palms that are set out in warm to hot weather will probably need to be watered every day for the first seven days after planting, then every two or three days for the next several weeks, depending on the soil. Check the soil moisture content in the root ball to determine this. The goal at this stage is to keep the soil moist but not constantly soggy wet. The palm root ball will often dry out faster than the surrounding backfill soil. This difference may be visible at the soil surface.
Some helpful info from Palmbob:
This is one of the most commonly sold 'house palms' nowadays, and the sad thing is it performs terribly as one. It is a great outdoor plant, though in the continental US it's a bit hard to keep from yellowing at the tips, especially if planted in full sun. It is a relatively fast palm for Southern California, and grows faster the more heat and water it gets. It eventually grows to 50' or more in the US, but in Madagascar, it's home, it can get up to nearly 100'. As the name suggests, it grows along rivers and loves to have its roots constantly moist. The only major dangers to this palm are cold (can't handle temps below the mid 20sF) and snails LOVE it, and will quickly shred the leaves to bits. Watering the crown, particularly in the cooler months of the year, and especially the cool months to warm month period, is risky (though rain water seems to be OK... tap water is the problem). Rot/bud damage is very common in this species, at it is in many of the non-crownshafted feather-leaf palms, from tap water on the crowns ANY time of the year... but mostly in late winter/spring, as the palm starts to grow again... so if you plant this palm in your lawn, try to avoid having the sprinkler hit the crown. It is nearly impossible to overwater the roots of this plant (unless maybe planted in a very heavy clay soil)... but the crown is very sensitive to being 'overwatered'. I can't tell you how often i see this happen around southern California (and happened to several of my own palms)... live and learn.
More info about your palm.
http://www.pacsoa.org.au/palms/Ravenea/rivularis.html
http://www.floridagardener.com/palms/majestypalm.htm

My suspicion is that you may be overwatering and the sun has burned the fronds. Don't remove them yet, but give your palm at least a month to get adjusted. Do not fertilize for another 2 months unless you want to add a half cup of epsom salt to your watering can IN ABOUT A MONTH. That might help with the yellowing.

I notice that you have been active on the gardening boards and would like to suggest you add your state and hardiness zone to your profile so it shows like mine does. It would be most helpful to those of us trying to assist you. That way we won't have to ask and you won't have to remember to tell us.

Hope this is helpful,
Newt
 
  #14  
Old 08-11-06, 12:03 AM
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Sorry guys. I live in Southern California, Huntington Beach (about 2 miles from the beach). i think the hardiness zone is
10A.
 
  #15  
Old 08-11-06, 08:15 AM
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Ah, so I'm thinking you have sandy soil. If so, you will find that you will get yellowing. The water will probably drain away quickly then.

Newt
 
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