Drip irrigation/soaker hoses?

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Old 08-08-06, 04:37 PM
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Drip irrigation/soaker hoses?

I just had a patio installed, with plantings around the perimeter. There are a row of daylilies, some hydrangeas, holly, and rose of sharon, a couple of forsythia and a kwonzon (sp?) cherry tree. Since we've just got the plants in and are ready to mulch, I want to "bury" some soaker hose under the mulch all around. My landscaper thinks it's "unnecessary", as the area is "easy to hit with a hose", in his opinion. I'm thinking that an hour of two of drip irrigation per day is easy to do absentee, plus won't get my patio all wet. If it's advisable, I'll happily weave the soaker hose around and between all the plants. What do you think?
 
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Old 08-08-06, 05:26 PM
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Drip irrigation/soaker hoses?

If you are talking about the mini porous soaker hoses, they do work and you can hook them up to your garden hose and a timer.

Make sure the lengths of the porous hose are all about the same length. Keep the lengths short since the ends can get starved at low volumes/ptressure.

Dick
 
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Old 08-09-06, 04:54 AM
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pressure's not a problem, as I recently had my water main replaced and now have such force that I had to replace the fittings on the hose (it kept blowing right off). if I have a row of daylilies behind a more sporadic row of hydrangea, holly, and rose of sharon, am I right to think that I should "weave the hose in and around, rather than just run straight by?
 
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Old 08-11-06, 05:10 AM
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Originally Posted by Concretemasonry
Make sure the lengths of the porous hose are all about the same length. Keep the lengths short since the ends can get starved at low volumes/ptressure.
Dick
well, you were right about length; with three 50 ft. lengths, the last 49 feet or so drip significantly less water than the the first 101 ft. I wonder if it would be any better if I put a split at the end of the "feeder" hose, before it connects to the soakers, and had it connect to 2 lengths of soaker separately?
 
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Old 08-15-06, 01:39 PM
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Have you considered a drip irrigation system?

I switched from soaker to drip and find the pressure to be more consistent, because you determine the locations where the water is dispensed to the plants by punching the holes in the line and running the drip units directly to the area you want watered.

You can add a timer and an attachment that you load with fertilizer tablets during the growing seaseon that feed the plants each time you water.
 
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Old 08-20-06, 05:12 PM
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Originally Posted by Stumped1
Have you considered a drip irrigation system?
sounds interesting....I did hook the soaker system to a timer while I was away over the last week, and all seems fine upon my return, but if you know of anywhere (url?) that has a "drip tuturial" I might dig it all up next year. Thanks for the tip.
 
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Old 08-21-06, 04:29 PM
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You could google "drip irrigation" and probably find something. But it's not very complicated.

It's semi-soft 1/2"-3/4" irrigation hose, you punch holes in with a tool you buy ($5.00), then connect the 1/4 tubing that you run to wherever you have plants and connect a dripper attachment. You really don't have to bury the line, you can just mulch over it, that's what I did.
 
  #8  
Old 08-25-06, 07:44 PM
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Eddie,
Just my two cents here. I installed soaker hoses in my garden several years ago and love it. Wait till the season is over and the local stores will discount the hoses and timers just so they wont have to store them for the winter.

Also I put a valve at the beginning so If I need to water a certain section I can. Just a thought.

Good luck!
 
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Old 08-26-06, 08:47 AM
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[in response to Curious Homeowner] "Just my two cents here. I installed soaker hoses in my garden several years ago and love it. Wait till the season is over and the local stores will discount the hoses and timers just so they wont have to store them for the winter. Also I put a valve at the beginning so If I need to water a certain section I can. Just a thought. Good luck!"

I agree, thanks. I think my 200 ft of soaker hose, purchased at $9.99 per 50 ft, and the $25 timer work just fine (actually, they're fine since I removed a flow-limiting washer of sorts that was in the female end of each length; blocked the whole hose save for a 2 mm center hole). I routed it with a series of Y-connectors, so I can easily turn off/on separate sections. I have it timed to water each morning from 6-8 a.m. and the hydrangeas and friends seem very pleased!
 
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Old 08-28-06, 09:00 PM
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Sounds like you have it under control!
 
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