Water problem... Please help....

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  #1  
Old 06-18-07, 11:01 AM
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Water problem... Please help....

I had a house built in August of last year in a subdivision. It was built by a company that started the subdivision and they took care of building the house, landscaping, driveway, etc..... My backyard was fine until they built a few more houses up the street from me. I am now starting to get a valley in my yard from the water running down and it has also washed the grass away. I had a wood privacy fence put up and it only took one rain for it to have a valley under the fence. I contacted the builder about the problem since I have a one year warranty and they told me that it was a natural water runoff and there is nothing they can do about it. They didnt even come out and look at it. I really cant run the water in any other direction since one way is up hill and the other way will run into the side of my house. Does anyone have any help or directions for me to go to solve this problem. It is only getting worse everytime it rains. Not sure if there is some kind of french drain type system that may work. Please help... Thanks in advance for your help.

Josh
 
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  #2  
Old 06-19-07, 02:30 PM
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Construction site storm water runoff control problems should be brought to the attention of the local building inspector. Construction sites can release significant amounts of sediment into storm water and eventually into a municipality’s storm water drainage system. Drainage issues should have been addressed so that water would not run onto neighboring properties. Building codes should address the direction of storm runoff.

You can have a landscape engineer take a look at your lawn to discuss the potential of regrading your lawn in such a way to direct water away from the house, trenching or adding drainage ditch, and French drain system.

A responsible builder should have taken into consideration the runoff issues and addressed them. http://www.nbnnews.com/NBN/issues/2004-03-29/Green+Building/3.html

Storm run off is of major concern because sediment pollutes and fills our streams. With longer and heavier rains, your yard will gradually become a bigger problem as it collects more water. Of greater concern is the impact that water will have on your home.

http://www.wen.ncsu.edu/watershed/newspaper/Buncombe.htm
 
  #3  
Old 06-20-07, 05:21 AM
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Thanks twelvepole. Who would be a good person to contact in my area? I found out that we have a place called Home Builders Association of Anderson for the county that I live in. I am not sure if ther could help out or not. I was told by a professional land scaper at Clemson University to call the Residential Home Builders Commission but I cant seem to find a number for that anywhere. I also cant get ahold of the landscaper that gave me the name to see if that is the right place to call or not.
 
  #4  
Old 06-21-07, 11:57 AM
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i would keep pounding on the builder. the squeekiest wheel gets the grease. mybe they could install a rock or concrete flume if they can not redirect the water. at least the erosion will stop and your grass will grow in. not sure how much water you are talking about, but a french drain is for nusence water, not flowing water.
 
  #5  
Old 06-23-07, 08:25 PM
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Contact your local building inspector re: runoff problems and enforcement of any codes. Codes tend to vary from area to area. Some areas have progressed to the point where building permits have to include runoff issues and how they will be managed.

If your issues fall on deaf ears, then you are on your own and with a landscape engineer. This should not be so, but often life is not fair. In the meantime, you can continue to complain to the homebuilder.

I have been a member of two states' Home Builder Associations. The only thing they can do is provide you with a list of licensed landscape engineers.

Never lived anywhere where they had a Residential Home Builders Commission. Sounds like a private club for contractors that are not members of the state HBA and NHBA. I could be wrong.

The first place to start is at your local Building Inspector's Office. If no luck there, then check to see if your state has a Erosion Control and Storm Water Management group. Erosion control & storm water management is a hot topic.
 
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