Installing landscape drain pipe

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  #1  
Old 04-28-08, 10:04 AM
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Installing landscape drain pipe

Is it better to use a nylon sleeve to cover 4 " slotted drain pipe? Or is burying the pipe in a gravel bed a better solution? Should you do both? Also are you supposed to install drain pipe right next to the foundation wall? Or a few inches away? (I can't find any diagrams/pictures that show how close the drain pipe should be to the foundation.) Will drain pipe be effective if you cannot dig right next to the foundation wall (as with a masonry planter or patio/porch attached to house)?
 
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  #2  
Old 04-28-08, 07:56 PM
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If you use slotted pipe you will need to use the sleeve to keep soil from infiltrating. The pipe should also be on a gravel bed. The problem with using a slotted pipe near or along the foundation is that most of the water will drain out near the foundation. Depending on your particular situation you may need to use solid pipe to move the water away from the house and have it empty into a dry well. Here's some helpful sites.
http://www.michaelholigan.com/depart...GNT9PBV4N9512#
http://www.askthebuilder.com/175_Dry...ch_Drain.shtml
http://www.gardenadvice.co.uk/howto/...d/frenchdrain/
http://www.easydigging.com/Drainage/..._soakaway.html

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 04-29-08, 06:47 AM
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Thanks for the links. Actually the"ask the builder" example seems to be closer to what I need. I will definitely cover the bottom of the trench with landscape fabric on a gravel bed. I get what you are saying about the pipe being too close to the foundation and dumping the water back on the foundation.

I have to improve the grade, so I'm guessing I need to dig the trench at the lowest point of the grade? Do I have that right?

I see from the instructions that the drain pipe holes always point downward. So there's never a situation where it's better to have the holes pointing up?

Will digging a trench/installing drain pipe still help in a situation where drain pipe is not connected to downspouts? Mine are tied into the sewer system (city regulation).

As it stands, I intend to use the model where the trench is 24" deep x 6" wide, on a bed of 1 inch gravel using 4 inch diameter pipe. Is this pretty much the standard?
 

Last edited by Aseret_in_MO; 04-29-08 at 07:09 AM.
  #4  
Old 04-29-08, 07:57 AM
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Aseret, you are very welcome.

I have to improve the grade, so I'm guessing I need to dig the trench at the lowest point of the grade? Do I have that right?
Improve the grade by sloping the soil away from the house. You can slope the grade of the trench you dig as well.

I see from the instructions that the drain pipe holes always point downward. So there's never a situation where it's better to have the holes pointing up?
I can't think of one, but that doesn't mean one doesn't exist.

Will digging a trench/installing drain pipe still help in a situation where drain pipe is not connected to downspouts? Mine are tied into the sewer system (city regulation).
If the property is sloped towards the house then it should be somewhat helpful, but the first thing to do is slope the land away from the house. If the downspouts are already connected to the sewer system and your land slopes away from the house, you might want to check to see if they were properly done. Maybe they are slotted and have become clogged because they weren't covered with landscape cloth or have become disconnected.

As it stands, I intend to use the model where the trench is 24" deep x 6" wide, on a bed of 1 inch gravel using 4 inch diameter pipe. Is this pretty much the standard?
Just about every site you go to will have a version of it.

You might find this helpful too.
http://www.extension.iastate.edu/Pub...ons/PM1560.pdf
http://www.askthebuilder.com/B67_Tip...d_Houses.shtml

Newt
 
  #5  
Old 04-29-08, 08:13 AM
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Thanks so much for the feedback. I will check out these links. I believe the grade was good when the house was built, but a stone planter and patio was added much later, and I don't think they regraded it properly after the addition. As far as the downspouts tieing into the sewer system, the house is 80 years old and the city code requiring drains to tie into the sewer system has been around for decades. The pipe that leads from the downspouts to the sewer system looks to be a 3 inch round metal pipe. I'm almost certain it's a solid pipe that runs along the easement and connects to the sewer line. You are right, the connecting pipe it may be clogged after all these years, but it would take a crew and backhoe and thousands of $$$ to dig it up and replace, thus I'm looking into installing the landscaping drain pipe to see if that helps. Thanks so much for the suggestions.
 
  #6  
Old 04-29-08, 08:40 AM
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Well, if the pipe is 80 years old it could have erroded over time. I wonder what it's made from. Anyway, I 'hear' you about the expense to dig it up and inspect it. I hope those sites will help you with a solution. Since you mention the later addition of a patio and planters, take a look here too.
http://www.michaelholigan.com/depart...GNT9PBV4N9512#

Newt
 
  #7  
Old 04-29-08, 09:07 AM
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Installing landscape drain pipe

You should never connect a downspout drain to a pipe sustem for below drainage.water removal. They are two separate systems. - In your case, the city system was apparently designed to include storm water. Your pipe is probably cast iron, based on the age of the house.

The reason for not connecting the two systems (roof and foundation), is that you could have a problem with storms water from the roof flooding the foundation system by giving it a quick intinial surge of water. The foundation pipe sees the water later for a longer period of time.

When you are carrying the water away from your house to a "daylight" drain, you can switch to non-perforated pipe to minimize infiltration and maximize the flow.

The deeper you have your foundation drain pipe, the better job it will do the reduce the water level and can even eliminate water under your slab if you have decent soil.

Dick
 
  #8  
Old 04-29-08, 01:04 PM
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Where I am, the perforated pipe is always laid a bit lower than basement floor (about same level as foundation footing), and it does take downpipes. We have deep basements and massive rainfall - hookup to city storm sewer is a must. Percolation down to pipe can be improved with rock... if that's all good then surface grade is irrelevant.
 
  #9  
Old 04-29-08, 01:43 PM
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Thanks so much for the suggestions. I understand the comment about storm water being a problem with the downspouts tied into the sewer system, but that's the city code and we all have to abide by it. And as far as burying the pipe below the level of the basement floor, I'm not going to go that route unless it is absolutely necessary. We have no standing water in the basement so far, and we're talking about an 80 yr old limestone foundation. What I do have is an efflorescence problem with the mortar between the limestone, and I am hoping the 2 foot trench drain will help alleviate the problem. If not, I will have to shell out for a foundation specialist to come out and have a look. Thanks everyone for the feedback!
 
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