Sprinkler Winterizing

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  #1  
Old 10-08-08, 06:40 PM
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Sprinkler Winterizing

We moved into a house recently that has a sprinkler system. We have never had a sprinkler system before. Is it possible for us to winterize it or should we call someone?
 
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  #2  
Old 10-18-08, 06:04 AM
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Hi Tornadomom,

Congratulations on your new home! You should find this site most helpful to maintain your irrigation system.
http://www.irrigationtutorials.com/

You might want to keep this one for next year.
http://aggiehorticulture.tamu.edu/ex...ter/water.html

Newt
 
  #3  
Old 11-30-08, 11:42 AM
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Location: Grayson, GA
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I purchased the Makita MAC5200 to blow-out (winterize) my underground sprinkler system. I have 6 zones with my longest run about 400 feet with 6 Hunter rotary heads. The compressor worked great and saved me $95. With the accessories and fittings I purchased at Lowes to make an adaptor it will pay for itself in 4 years. It takes about 75 seconds for the tank to recover from each use. You get from 45 to 30 seconds of air time and it took 4 to 6 times to completely blow out each zone. The compressor is very well built. It is rated at 6.5 CFM @ 90 psi.
 
  #4  
Old 12-01-08, 07:14 AM
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hope that works out for you. Sometimes the lower CFM compressors push out the top layer of water of the pipes and it seems that the lines are empty, but they are not. Enough water was pushed out just to let the air escape.

Its not impossible to do this with your compressor, but its difficult. Glad you found a solution but its not neccessarily 100%. Although it should be fine, the only way to test it is to wait for next year after winter has come and gone.

To give you a comparison, we use 100-200 CFM but so long as you did each zone several times, you should have enough removed to be fine. If not, you will know in a year or two (sometimes it does not break the first year, just gets weak).
 
  #5  
Old 12-06-08, 02:48 PM
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1st time poster needs your advice about this please

Hi - sure hope you can tell me....I live in the northeast where we are starting to have the freezing nights. Due to family emergency, I have been away from my home for quite a while. Have a fairly new home that I am now caring for alone. Ran the sprinkler system maybe 3 times this summer - last time was in July - for never more than 1 hour total time for all zones combined.

Just got home & ran downstairs to shut off the water valves for the outside water. It sadly dawned on me then that I never made arrangements to have the sprinkler lines cleared. Is there hopefully a good chance that there wasn't much water in there before the temps started freezing?

Can I still try to clear them if we get a warm enough day, or must I now wait for the spring thaw (& hope & pray)?

Thanks for any advice you can offer...this is all new to me & I'm kinda overwhelmed & a little shy/embarrassed to ask my neighbor.
 
  #6  
Old 12-06-08, 02:51 PM
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Red face

oh - I should also add that I did check out the link you posted below. Great for future use but I didn't find an answer to my immediate problem
 
  #7  
Old 12-08-08, 06:51 AM
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its not too late yet to have the lines blown out. What you will be protecting is the main and lateral lines that are underground. Anything above ground at this point is most likely damaged. This would normall be a vacuum breaker of somet type at best and at worst, nothing.

Go outside where the water exits the house and take a look at the pipes there. If you can, take a picture because it would be faster and easier to list/explain.

I use image shack and once you upload the pic, you can cut and paste the line of text made for forums.

Shutting off the water in the basement means your yard wont flood if something breaks and just lets the water run and run, so that was a good idea.
 
  #8  
Old 12-08-08, 08:56 AM
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thanks!

I appreciate your advice, theCaptain! I am breathing a bit easier now.
 
  #9  
Old 12-08-08, 10:16 AM
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you still need to take care of the outside to hopefully prevent damage if it has not occured already. Do you know what the pipes are like on the outside of the house? Since you know where they exit just go outside to roughly the same spot and let me know what you have out there. There may still be a few things you can do to help limit the damage from the cold, or help until you can get a company out there to take care of this for you.
 
  #10  
Old 12-09-08, 06:44 AM
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Thanks Captain, sorry I didn't post back sooner. I did call a company who came out. Luckily no damage done except to a hose that I hadn't taken off the spigot. I did get the "just in time" talk - deserved it too

I'm so happy this DIY website exists. There is a lot I don't know about home upkeep & I'm being forced to learn in a hurry.
I have a feeling that "embarrassed smilie" is going to be my companion for a while!

Thanks again!
 
  #11  
Old 12-09-08, 11:59 AM
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not a problem. glad i could be of help.
 
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