Tree suggestions?

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  #1  
Old 11-30-08, 08:00 AM
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Tree suggestions?

I live in New England (zone 6), and I want to plant 2 trees on my property for specific reasons, and I am looking for suggestions before I head to the nursery in the spring.

I would like to plant a fairly small (6' or so) ornamental or flowering tree in the front. However, it will be within 5' of my wellhead, and I'm concerned about the roots damaging the well.

Secondly, I'd like to plant a tree on the windward side of my home to help act as a windbreak (very strong winter winds). The only available spot is approx 10' from the house, so I don't want to get something too large (both height and width). Something hardy yet interesting (flowering?) would be nice.
 
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  #2  
Old 11-30-08, 08:23 AM
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Tree roots can extend outward 2-4 times the size of the canopy. Planting within 5 feet of well is not a good idea.

Windbreaks need to be spaced at a distance to block wind and redirect wind up over the windbreak and structure. 10' is not a great enough distance. Too, 10 feet is too close to plant a large tree near the structure.

WindbreakTrees.com
 
  #3  
Old 11-30-08, 08:40 AM
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Originally Posted by twelvepole View Post
Tree roots can extend outward 2-4 times the size of the canopy. Planting within 5 feet of well is not a good idea.

Windbreaks need to be spaced at a distance to block wind and redirect wind up over the windbreak and structure. 10' is not a great enough distance. Too, 10 feet is too close to plant a large tree near the structure.

WindbreakTrees.com
Not good. Problem with the windbreak is, the land drops away from my house on the windward side after the 10'. There's just no way to set a windbreak up any further away.
 
  #4  
Old 11-30-08, 09:44 AM
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Trackstar, you've received great info already so I'll try not to repeat that.

You still might be able to plant a tree in the area where the land drops off. Trees do grow on severe slopes. If you post a link to a picture of the area where the land drops off we might be able to help better.

You don't say what the sun conditions are where you want to plant in the front near the well head. If you have part sun conditions you might be able to plant a shallow rooted shrub such as a rhododendron. I would suggest a dwarf variety. You could even mound the soil that you will plant in to create a small berm. Here's some helpful info on rhododendrons.
Hancock Woodlands: Understanding & Growing Rhododendrons

Newt
 
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Old 11-30-08, 10:02 AM
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Originally Posted by Newt View Post
Trackstar, you've received great info already so I'll try not to repeat that.

You still might be able to plant a tree in the area where the land drops off. Trees do grow on severe slopes. If you post a link to a picture of the area where the land drops off we might be able to help better.

You don't say what the sun conditions are where you want to plant in the front near the well head. If you have part sun conditions you might be able to plant a shallow rooted shrub such as a rhododendron. I would suggest a dwarf variety. You could even mound the soil that you will plant in to create a small berm. Here's some helpful info on rhododendrons.
Hancock Woodlands: Understanding & Growing Rhododendrons

Newt
Thanks for the input. The windward side of the house is not very steep, but beyond the area I planned to plant the tree, is a stonewalled garden and beyond that a large lawn - neither of which I want to impede with trees. By the time we get to the existing treeline (which is full of mature, 60' trees, which apparently do nothing), the ground is a good 40' lower than my foundation.

Second: the wellhead: when I purchased the house, there were actually 2 rhodo's there. Mostly sun. I died and I yanked it out, and the other is dying. I have other rhodo's on the property and they are doing fine. Not my favorite plant though. I was hoping I could put a small dogwood there or some other small flowering tree to break up the front lawn.
 
  #6  
Old 11-30-08, 12:09 PM
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Trackstar, it sounds like your windbreak trees would need to be one of the Arborvitae cultivars due to the narrow width of the area. These two should work for you.

Techny Arborvitae -Thuja occidentalis
WindbreakTrees.com

Pyramidal Arborvitae -Thuja occidentalis 'pyramidlis'
WindbreakTrees.com

If you want some flowering, consider growing a small vine on it such as one of the shorter clematis cultivars.
Clematis viticella collection
Home of Clematis: Planting - Planting to Grow Through a Tree
http://netlist.co.nz/communities/NZG...ematisRimu.jpg
http://awaytogarden.com/space-saving...nes-up-a-shrub

Not sure what has done in your rhodos, but you might want to read this site about planting on a leach field and shallow rooted trees and shrubs.
Planting on Your Septic Drain Field

Newt
 

Last edited by Newt; 11-30-08 at 02:19 PM.
  #7  
Old 11-30-08, 12:39 PM
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Thanks for the info. I am concerned about using arbovitae due to the frequent ice and heavy snow...I have 4 in front of my house and it's a battle every year to keep them intact (I ties the stems together with twine in the winter).
 
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