Standing water under house, bad grading

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Old 04-29-09, 07:31 AM
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Standing water under house, bad grading

I'm not sure if this is the correct forum to post this in...

My house is on pier (post) and beam so underneath is just dirt. I just tore up my front porch, and of course the great flood came through. I noticed not only that there are low spots all over the place, especially around the piers, but the earth under the house is generally lower than the surrounding beds. There's lots of standing water and general dampness which I now see is probably the source of our mosquito problems. I also saw that a lot of the mulch from the back beds ended up under the front porch so there's clearly a flow under the house. All in all I guess I have a grading problem under the house.

How would you go about solving this? I guess the obvious laborious task is to dump a bunch of clay soil (houston) at the edge and start crawling and pushing. Since this sounds like such a tremendous pain, do you think this is the right solution? Is this a common problem for pier and beam houses?
 
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Old 04-29-09, 07:42 AM
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How much room do you have? You are on the right track, one area has to go up or the other areas have to go down. If you have enough height, adding as you suggested is not that bad. I built a sled that we pulled in and out to transport the dirt. We were digging out but the principal is the same. Sure beats raking. Of course you may not have many old snow sleds down there, but I'm sure you can improvise.

Bud
 
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Old 04-29-09, 08:51 AM
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Just enough room to sit up between the joists, of course you might get a nail in the head. I'm concerned that not only will the amount of dirt be way more than I can practically move in that cramped space, or pay for, but also that it won't compact and end up washed out.

The sled is a good idea, and no we don't have sleds here, though a red rider wagon may do the trick.
 
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Old 04-29-09, 09:37 AM
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Perhaps a diversion around the house would be enough to keep it dry. 6" under a 2,000 sq ft house would be about 37 yards. At $10 per yard, that's $370. However, moving 37 yards by hand and wagon will win you an award, at least from me. Adjust for your footprint and depth as needed, and the cost of fill.

Around the outside, say 180 linear feet by three feet by a foot deep. That's about 20 yards. So building up around the outside would be about half the materials and a thousand times easier.

You'll have to judge the amount of water flowing into that space and the barrier required to hold it back. The need for gutters if you don't have them and perhaps a sump hole under there somewhere. But, if your landscaping can handle it, building a berm would be cheaper and easier.

Do you need a pond somewhere? Use that dirt as your fill.

Bud
 
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Old 04-29-09, 09:39 AM
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Great info, thanks for the numbers. That gives me something practical to chew on. A pond...I like the way you think.
 
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