Sprinkler pvc repair...this always happens to me

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Old 02-06-10, 03:48 PM
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Sprinkler pvc repair...this always happens to me

Every time I try to make a repair/modification to my sprinkler system I always seem to end up in the same spot of trying to force the correct length of pvc repair pipe into two couplings yet I have to force and flex the existing pipes so far that I'm afraid of breaking them.

That's where I'm at now, again. I decided since it has been cold to do some work on my sprinkler line by installing a new ball valve to replace the old rusted shutoff valves.

So try to imagine the incoming water from the left, a gap, then the valve and piping on the right.

( gap ) [valve]------->
---> ( gap )

That's actually how it appears when looking down on the whole setup. I've already unsuccessfully attempted to join the pipe/valve once. I used 2 45 degree elbows to form a backward S and this did put them on the same level with each other, but then I get to the point of inserting the several inches of pipe and then in order to get it to fit snugly into the elbow and valve I have to twist and yank each one so far out of the way I don't want to cause other breaks in the line.

Is there some kind of flexible pvc pipe available for this short distance? That would be a tremendous time saver right now and really make this a lot easier for me.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 07:48 PM
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Do you know what a union is used for? It might help.



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Old 02-06-10, 08:07 PM
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I've seen union on copper/brass fittings before, sure. PVC i've never used them though. I'm not sure how one would help? Remember it's not quite a straight line from left to right. The total gap between the pipe is maybe 7-8 inches, but then it is also offset by maybe 2+ inches, which is why i used the 2 45 degree elbows.
 
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Old 02-06-10, 08:26 PM
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Then maybe I don't understand what you're asking. A picture might help. Usually you use a union where you have existing lines on each side and you install the union where your last section of straight pipe will go. You said, "I always seem to end up in the same spot of trying to force the correct length of pvc repair pipe into two couplings". This is where a union is used. Separate the union into its 2 parts, cut that last section of pipe into 2 parts. Put one half of the union on one piece of pipe, the other half on the other piece of pipe, glue them into the coupling, and the two halves should meet in the middle. Then screw them together.
 
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Old 02-07-10, 02:10 PM
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Thanks...I realize my explanation may not be the best. Today I spent extra time digging up more pipe. I decided I'd try and replace the entire section of pipe back to the valve instead of using more couplings. And I actually got it finished a short while ago! I'm going to let the cement set for another 24 hours since it's been rather cold before I test it. After I went in to remove some of the old pipe I guess it was a good thing I did because there was a section that was very brittle and didn't take much at all to break it. I'm wondering what might have caused that but at least now by replacing that entire section I've completed some preventative maintenance work.
 
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