A walk way made from 2x6 boards

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Old 11-16-10, 10:51 AM
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A walk way made from 2x6 boards

I am wanting opinions on my idea of laying down a walkway (40ft) long with some pre cut 2x6 pieces of wood.

Would laying them down like a set of train tracks work? Laying two rails and then nailing or screwing the boards across?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 11:08 AM
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Sounds like you're building something resembling a dock

I've seen this done, though 2x material might be thicker than you need on top, decking is usually only 5/4
 
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Old 11-16-10, 11:15 AM
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Yeah, but these pcs. I have will cost me $0. I just want to make sure they wont rot in a years time.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 12:17 PM
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Are they pressure treated rated for ground contact?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 12:32 PM
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I dont believe so. would maybe putting down a plastic barrier then the boards work? Spraying some thompsons wood sealer?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 12:56 PM
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Thompsons is junk

If this isn't PT wood, you might be able to get some more time with a good deck sealer but the wood is going to rot with the ground contact
 
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Old 11-16-10, 12:56 PM
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I'm afraid that laying plastic under them will just trap water. Thompson's waterseal might help but it would need to be redone every 6-12 months. If the wood isn't pressure treated or cedar, cyprus or maybe redwood - it probably wouldn't be worth the effort to put it together.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 01:11 PM
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At the coast I've also seen temporary walkways made by using rope to hold the boards together. The rope can be stapled to the bottom of the boards or if you want to get fancy you drill a hole through both ends of each board and thread the rope down the length of boards to create a walkway. If you make sections in some manageable length it can be easily movable.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 01:13 PM
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Plastic is definetley a bad idea. I could use some type of pea gravel and lanscape fabric.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 01:23 PM
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Gravel is a good idea! That will help moisture drain away from the wood. Did you ever say what type of wood it is?
 
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Old 11-16-10, 01:48 PM
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really not sure what type of wood. its plain 2x6's that were cut to go in between pallet racking, it seems somewhat like the typical 2x4's one would by just to add a wall or something. I also wondered if I were to use pressure treated lumber for the rails then the cheap stuff I have for the walkway, if that would work.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 01:58 PM
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Most of the pallets & racking in my warehouse are yellow pine or oak. They hold up much better to the weather than spruce but not as good as pressure treated.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 02:00 PM
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If it’s non-treated lumber, you’ll be building a short life project. You’ll get some extra life if the ‘rails’ allow the boards to not have direct ground contact and permit air circulation underneath. Unlike a train track, the ends of the boards should be fastened so they extend only a short distance over the exterior of your rails . . . otherwise the lumber will curl upwards and tend to split or pull-up the nails.

Unless the boards are significantly spaced apart from one another, wood sealer will not cover the edges. As water drips down the edges of the boards w/ nothing protecting them, they will begin rotting out at the bottom edge even if you’re diligently applying a water sealer to the top.

I see you reside in central FL, and FL is one of the worst locations to build something like your contemplating. During our wet season, the bottom of any boards contacting the ground are likely to remain damp or wet for weeks at a time, and our high humidity is another contributor to wood rot. Untreated wood contacting the ground will start rotting within a year. If you get untreated wood off of the ground, you might get 3 or so years before needing to be replaced. Another consideration is that the walk surface will become very slick with a black mold on top if not cleaned and sealed about every 9 or so months . . . people can easily loose their footing when that black mold gets wet.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 02:03 PM
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Years ago I built a small pool deck with some poplar boards that I got for free [decent looking 1x boards] I applied 2 good coats of an oil base deck stain and the poplar still didn't last much over 1 yr
 
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Old 11-16-10, 02:15 PM
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Pressure Treated definetly seems the way to go. I might use the other wood for fire wood. (LOL) Thanks for everyone's input.
 
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Old 11-16-10, 02:33 PM
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For economy I'd suggest you use landscape timbers for the rails. At least here they are relatively cheap. You may also be able to find used railroad tites for the side rails. I'd pin them to the ground with rebar.
 
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