Good ditch barrier plants for the south

Reply

  #1  
Old 05-17-12, 09:33 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 49
Good ditch barrier plants for the south

Hey guys,

I just built a house that is on a dead end bordering a drainage servitude (ditch). The loose dirt along the edge of the lot is getting washed out rather quickly by rain water (because my lot is elevated) and I thought about planting grass to prevent this. But the ditch is somewhat unsightly with plenty of "weeds" growing in it right up to my lawn so I'd rather plant something that serves the dual purpose of being a barrier to the unsightly ditch (tall, full) and also has roots that will hold that dirt tight and keep it from eroding further. The plant also needs to grow well in wet environments, in the south Louisiana climate and grow year-round and rather quickly. I'd plant a row of this plant along the ~50 foot area with the issue. Excuse my lack of horticulture lingo.

So far I've thought of bamboo (which I don't like that much, cat tails, day lilies and iris' but I think some of these are perennials and I'm not sure how rapidly they grow.

Thanks for the help.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 05-17-12, 10:14 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 32,875
Welcome to the forums. I have deleted your other post. Please no duplicate posts in different forums.
 
  #3  
Old 05-17-12, 11:34 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,968
Welcome to the forums! You may want to look in to low growing junipers. You can spot them out along the ditch and they will grow and enmesh themselves causing a complete cover. They will do well in your climate. You do not under any circumstances want bamboo. It is basically uncontrollable.
 
  #4  
Old 05-18-12, 05:17 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 49
Sorry Ray, in my experience with forums some people tend to browse only certain sections pertinent to their interest. I didn't want to miss any expertise, ergo posting to both the horticulture and landscaping forums. I'll keep this in mind in the future for you.
 
  #5  
Old 05-18-12, 05:22 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 49
I do like the look of junipers. How tall will the low growing variety get? How far should the be spotted from one another? I ask because I want the roots to be dense enough and enough "noise" at ground level to slow down the water flow. Would I be able to plant them ON the grade (about 45 degree)?
 
  #6  
Old 05-18-12, 06:39 AM
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: NC, USA
Posts: 17,617
You will see a pattern in my suggestions. I like plants to work for me. Not only do I want them to prevent erosion I also want to eat them or have them look pretty.

If the area is shaded I vinca which is very hearty, spreads naturally forming a dense, low, dark green ground cover that flowers. Dianthus is a possibility if the area gets full sun. It does not tolerate being wet but since you mention the steep bank it should be well drained and it handles summer heat and drout. And, believe it or not I would also consider strawberries. They spread like a weed and they flower & produce fruit. Wild varieties are more hearty and can tolerate more shade but at the expense of fruit production.

Then as a whole other group of possibility are herbs. There are many varieties of mint that would work well. And, when you run over them with the mower you get a minty fresh burst. There are also many varieties of creeping thyme and you to pick the variety depending on how high you want it to grow. There are also numerous varieties of basil that would work.

I have a steep bank on the side of my pond dam. Grass and weeds were boring so I have it planted with several varieties of mint, basil and poppies. A few times a year I'll go crazy with the weed eater to keep it looking more manicured but other than that it's pretty maintenance free. Even the poppies, which cannot stand our summer heat do well since they come up in late winter, flower in spring and self seed for the next season.
 
  #7  
Old 05-18-12, 07:06 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2012
Posts: 49
Thanks Pilot. When I mention barrier, I wasn't only referring to something that would solidify the ground and act as a buffer to the weeds in the ditch. I also hoped to find plants of at least moderate height that would act as a visual barrier as well. This would be ideal. Obviously, priority number one is to stop the erosion and keep the ditch vegetation from creeping into me lawn.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
'