My nasty backyard lawn

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Old 04-29-15, 10:38 AM
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Wink My nasty backyard lawn

Hello there... I am having the major remodeling at my home. First things first I have to do is to clean and clear off the yards. Just need your advices and opinions of how I can do it in the easy way. Of course you might say, chainsaw will do it.

Let me tell you little bit about my home. My grandparent bought this land and a old house when my mother was thirteen years old. The old house was destroyed and replaced a mobile home when I was in my childhood. One of these pictures has a old sidewalk and a step in the front yard, that used to be an old house! So, for long time, my families had a hard time keeping it up the place, and I've decided to move here and wanting to fix and refresh everything to keep the memories going. It's going to be interesting when the work is done.

So! Here are several pictures and I'm sure you'll say that it look terrible! That is why I'm here to ask for all of your advices. I am going to start the backyard to cut all the baby trees and build two bonfire in my garden area and other side yard.

By the way, I will have these project of all kinds in "My Project" whenever I get it together. Thanks!











 
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Old 04-29-15, 11:32 AM
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Hello and welcome to the forums...

Looks like wet land somewhat.. I guess its just labor intensive to cut down off the overgrown stuff. If you want grass then a weed and feed first off then overseed in the fall. It will take time...

Overseed every year till you get something looking good..

So yes looks like a chainsaw will come in handy. The thing is I guess how to dispose of it all.
 
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Old 04-29-15, 11:40 AM
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Keep in mind that stumps are harder to remove once the tree is gone. If you can dig the roots loose you can use the tree or bushe's height as leverage to get the stump gone also.
Just getting everything cleaned up where the yard is mowable will make a big improvement!
 
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Old 04-29-15, 12:05 PM
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I agree with removing the underbrush and trees with a tractor or lift mechanism after digging the roots somewhat. Pulling them with a chain will be better with the shaft still attached. You have quite a bit of work to do, but it is purely doable with determination.
 
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Old 04-29-15, 12:11 PM
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Thank you Iawrosa for warm welcome. Yes it was really wet land for while due of lot of rains in the past. I already had a friend helped me out cutting the trees and such. I do know it takes time to get it done, but I am just take it easy from time to time when I possibly can. I was surprisingly how of one or two trees just literally fall itself. I already got most part of it is done. Those pictures is about two weeks ago and couldn't posted it at that time because I had to create another username since I couldn't get e-mail activation right or it had some kind of error processed. I contacted DIY moderator many times with no respond. I was out of my patient and decided to try with new account. My old username is Snakewind99 and I just can't post until someone accept me or something. Anyhow, I'm happy with this Snakecat99 with different e-mail.

I just took some pictures today and will upload it later tonight after I get off from work. It look a lot better, but still need more work. I still have problem with a stump where a large tree fell that has full of ant's home! Biggest ant's home I ever seen in person! I have to get ant killer then kill them before they bite me while digging.

Thanks Marksr for your advice. I'd appreciated that and it help me to think the easy way to work on it. The ground is so soft and it should able to get it out alright. Well, I'll post sometime tonight with new pictures of how much I've done to it. Also, I finally got rid most of those fences the one by the propane tank. You may noticed that the plumbing line is not right, well, I had trouble with the sewer line that is busted somewhere underneath the ground. I tried snake it out with powerful snake machine, and found a root in it. That made me sad. That's why I had to get my backyard clean up before digging the line and find it to replace it. It was fun somewhat because I can't wait to work my place up nicely in time.
 
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Old 04-29-15, 01:27 PM
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The fastest and best method to get the yard cleared would getting a excavator in to remove the trees. They could rip them out roots and all and should be a half day's work. While the machine is there it could also dig for the new drain line. And like MarkSr mentioned leaving the tree above ground make removing the stump easier. If I'm cutting the tree down I like to leave 4-6' of the tree above ground to give the equipment something to grab onto.

The cheaper more labor intensive method would be to cut down the trees. Before doing so I would by a jug of herbicide concentrate. Ones containing glyphosate work well and are relatively inexpensive and are sold under the brand names like; Roundup, Honcho, Glyfos. You want the 40% or higher strength concentrate. Then when you cut a tree off flush with the ground immediately paint the stump a few times with the concentrate. This will kill the roots and prevent the tree from regrowing. If you just cut them off and don't kill them you'll constantly be fighting water shoots springing up in the yard.
 
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Old 04-29-15, 01:35 PM
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How close are you to the Red River, and does it pose an unusual situation of wetness for the area?
 
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Old 04-30-15, 04:49 PM
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I have somewhat of a different perspective, from that of a gardener who tries to find uses in the resources that you want to eliminate (no criticism of anyone intended), and who doesn't have the option to rent or use equipment (I'd rather spend the money on seeds and plants!).

First, the photo of the house with a birdbath shows a lot of potential; the birdbath could easily be a center of attraction as you fix up the yard.

Second, you have a lot of very straight saplings and young trees which could be harvested to make trellises, if you're so inclined and want to eventually grow roses or vining plants.

Third, there's an easy way to kill stumps. Leave a few feet of stump after you cut down the trees, dig out around the stump so that there's sufficient area to plant, strip the bark off, then plant morning glory seeds. Vine them around the stump; they'll choke out the air and kill the stump. I use this tactic to kill mulberries and junk trees which grow without my permission.

There's a plant next to what I believe is a garage that looks like a yucca plant; save it, it's worth it to add some drama to the area. If you want a change of pace, divide the yucca as it's quite a large clump.

Sure, there's a lot to be done, but take it a section at a time, or a process at a time (all the tree cutting, then the stump work, etc.) and take some time to savor your hard work.

Good luck. You're undertaking a very worthwhile project to save a family home.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 05:04 PM
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then plant morning glory seeds
Oh goodness! He will have a mess once the morning glories take over. I live in the south, and we have morning glories, honeysuckle and kudzu. All invasive to the max.
 
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Old 04-30-15, 05:27 PM
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I was reading with an open mind until I saw the recommendation to plant morning glory. At least it wasn't suggested to put stink bugs in the yard.
 
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Old 05-01-15, 04:28 AM
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I wish I could keep the stink bugs in the yard, seems like every week I find one in the house
I believe this is the first time I ever heard of someone intentionally planting morning glories

almost forgot welcome to the forums NorthernWinds!
 
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Old 05-01-15, 05:02 AM
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20 years ago, wifey, new to Georgia, began her quest for ordering plants and seeds from the catalogs. Oh, only heirloom seeds and organic plantings, for sure She ordered a bunch and showed me the confirmation list from the provider. In it was 7 honeysuckle plants I could not get on the phone fast enough to the provider to cancel that part of the order. To this day, her nemesis is wild honeysuckle growing on fences. She hates it!!
 
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Old 05-04-15, 01:52 AM
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Cool New Photo Updated...

Pilot Dane, thanks for that advice about herbicide and I'll give a shot with roundup in near future whenever i'm ready to spray the yard.

Chandler, it is about probably 35 to 40 miles to get on red river county. I'm in Lamar county, and live less than a mile from the lake. I've never heard anything about being so wetness since I was gone for a year in Oklahoma. It's probably from all the snow or cold weather, but right now it seem much better, somewhat. Yeah Honeysuckles and kudzu, tsk tsk, I've been there.

Hello Northernwinds, welcome to the forum. It was pleasure of you throwing some conversations. It was great reading of what you said. I don't think I've heard Yucca plants. I'll have to look it up whenever I get a chance. I don't have a garage. Thanks, I am taking plenty of time myself to do every single thing from step to step correctly, and from time to time in my free time.
Well, I thought I had time to post my newest photo from last weekends, but I was busy and resting on my days off, ha... So far, it looks.... Much MUCH better. Tomorrow (which is this coming day), I am going to burn those bonfire so I can get it ready for my new shed soon.





 
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Old 05-04-15, 06:43 PM
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Boy I would find some rubber military type material and make a sling shot out of this tree..

Pumpkin launcher???

 
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Old 05-06-15, 09:12 AM
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Uh, oh, looks like I should have added some caveats with my suggestion of using morning glories to kill the stumps.

First, I wasn’t able to determine where SnakeCat lived, but assumed that it was at least somewhat of a northern climate (or at least one with cold winters) because of the bare (deciduous?) trees. Since I’m in Zone 5 and MGs are not a problem in this area, that assumption was extended (falsely, apparently).

I did miss the Red River reference and didn’t check it out to see where SnakeCat lived. I was thinking more of solutions to the specific issues than location. Mea culpa!

Second, I’m referring only to morning glories, not their wild relative bindweed, which I am aware is invasive in the South, but it’s not in my area. The two species are often confused, but they are in fact different. In addition, there are stunning Japanese morning glories which are fairly expensive and more for the gardener with a few extra dollars to spend. These would be prized, not rejected.

I’ve grown MGs since I was a child and never had a problem with them. Sometimes they will self spread but only nominally, unless the birds become involved and decide to relandscape the area.

Honeysuckle spreads here, but it’s not invasive. The biggest problem I have with invasive species are things like the black locus tree, which is like something from a sci fi horror movie with tentacles literally everywhere. Mulberries are almost as bad, and the wildlife help them colonize by feeding on them. However, MGs will kill a mulberry tree, so they’re worthy adversaries.

Sorry for the confusion; I should have been more clear on using MGs only in areas where they aren’t invasive. But I still will be using them this year to try to kill the black locusts!

SnakeCat, your yard is looking good - you've obviously been working hard at it, and it shows.
 
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