Small Hardscaping job


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Old 05-04-15, 10:53 AM
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Small Hardscaping job

Hey all. I am a newbie to this so any help would be appreciated. I am looking to level and fix a small retaining wall and a small area at the foot of my deck. The previous owner installed them and they need to be fixed. Problem is, I have no idea how to go about leveling and replacing them. Any help would be appreciated. Thanks.

http://imgur.com/gallery/tLAtU
 
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Old 05-04-15, 12:09 PM
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poor base for the stones

Those pavers at the foot of your deck look to be placed in the wood frame and just sitting on the grass. Proper method woud be to remove the pavers, and dig out enough dirt to build a proper base for the pavers. Others will give you exact directions but figure on excavating enough space for a 3 inch compacted rock base, followed by a layer of sand followed by the pavers. Since it appears that your pavers are sitting above ground level, there may be some special handling required. I believe the retaining wall probably suffers from the same problem of having an improper or missing base. Again, excavation and a proper base will probably solve the issue. All very straightforward work but labor intensive.

- Peter
 
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Old 05-04-15, 05:07 PM
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It looks like the previous owner followed the installation instructions from a big box home center. Start looking into how paver patios are laid and also the installation methods for segmented retaining walls. Basically most of the work goes into the base, footer or foundation to provide support to the stones. Many DIYers balk at putting so much work into something out of sight but it is key to a professional, long lasting patio or retaining wall, even if it's just edging a planting bed.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 06:43 AM
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Thanks for your help. I will attempt to start the work this weekend. Do I need those 2x4s on the side when I am done? Or can I just leave the pavers with no border? I guess in that case though I would need to place the pavers even with the grass though so they are not sticking up at all. Any thoughts? Thanks
 
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Old 05-06-15, 09:54 AM
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If the 2 x 4s are removed, the rows of pavers around the 3 exposed edges are likely to displace outwards (often with the least little encouragement). You will be talking to yourself every time you have to reset a displaced stone.

I'd either leave the 2 x 4s in place, or install a thinner, less visible border material, like heavy plastic edging.
 
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Old 05-06-15, 09:58 AM
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The pavers will need some type of border. I would not use wood as it will eventually decompose but in your situation it might be a decent option. They make a plastic edging especially for pavers that works quite well. The problem will be the height. Edging isn't meant to be a retaining wall (albeit a really short one). If you use wood most commonly available pressure treated wood that 2" thick is only treated for above ground use. If you use wood I would edge the stoop with 4x4, 4x6 or 6x6. It will have a more chunky look but at least the wood will be treated for ground contact.

I might pick 4x6 for the edging and place it vertically. This would get part of the edging below grade for support. Then I'd bore holes at an angle through the timbers and hammer in 2 or 3' long rebar stakes. Their long length and splaying them out at an angle will help hold the timber down to prevent frost heave. It's not perfect but it's easy and can work pretty well at holding them in place.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 05:03 AM
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What can I use as border for small landing area?

Here is my previous post and where the job started

http://www.doityourself.com/forum/br...aping-job.html

Here is my shoddy work on the replacement.

- Album on Imgur

Now I am left with an area under the rubber border that is not being held in. I didn't want to excavate the entire area so I just used the previous owner's base layer. Unfortunately as you can see there is no border there now to contain it. Someone mentioned putting soil around it to hold it in. Again, I am not very good at this type of thing. Any advice would be appreciated. Thanks.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 08:51 AM
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Advice was given in your previous post. Plastic edging is not designed for an edge like your's where the grade drops away.
 
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Old 05-14-15, 09:24 AM
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I merged your threads. It's always best to keep them in one thread, or it can get confusing and advice repeated.
 
 

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