Lawn growth problems

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  #1  
Old 05-15-15, 01:53 PM
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Lawn growth problems

I'm more than a little perplexed so any input is welcome. My lawn is thin and patchy and I'm not sure why. It gets watered with an irrigation system, full sun, Fertilize year round with organic slow release fertilizer. Core Aeration every fall with pelletized lime. Just checked the ph and it's 7.0 on the button!!! My thatch layer is no more than 1/2".

The lawn was doing great the first 10 years. I really didn't change anything. I dont spray weed killer or anything like that so I get my share of dandelions etc. I've read that an acidic soil is what brings on many of the weeds I have including chickweed. I don't know what else to check.

Input ???
 
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  #2  
Old 05-15-15, 03:23 PM
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If there weren't any problems for 10 years, something changed. Does the sewer line pass under your grass? Maybe there is leak. Is there a tree there? I always suggest that people remove the grass & install bricks.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 04:26 PM
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I agree with Puplo, something changed. But I doubt a sewer line would retard growth. If anything it would accelerate growth. My first inclination is a lack of nitrogen. You might want to call a lawn care outfit and have them do an analysis. If they can guaranty results take them on for a year and then do it on your own. As much as I hate to say it the non-natural chemicals will yield fast results vs the organic one. Another problem could be the severe winter we had. What part of NY are you from? If lots of salt was used to clear roads and walks it could easily get leached into the surrounding soil.
 
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Old 05-15-15, 04:48 PM
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No sewers and no roads anywhere near the area. I only fertilize about 2 times a year. The guys who cut my lawn take all the clippings. I wish they would leave them. Do you think it's a nitrogen deficiency because they'e carting all the clippings away ???
 
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Old 05-15-15, 05:10 PM
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Tell them to leave the clippings. That will return any nutrients back into the soil. Are you neighbors having similar problems?
 
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Old 05-15-15, 05:35 PM
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when do you over seed? Need to do it every fall in the east coast.. Then every other year when the lawn is established////
 
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Old 05-15-15, 05:46 PM
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Something tells me that it's not the lack of clippings. It has to be something else. Have you looked at the neighbors' lawns?
 
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Old 05-16-15, 05:26 AM
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Can you post a picture of the lawn?

What type grass do you have?

Have you looked at the lawn for signs of disease?
 
  #9  
Old 05-16-15, 05:58 AM
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I'd leave the clippings too . . . . if you have a population of earthworms, they'll come up to the surface and remove the clippings within a couple daya, and take them down to their burrows, while leaving their castings up on the surface to fertilize the grass.

That activity leaves the soil of my lawn well aerated so that water can easily make its way into the ground.

Robins are constantly patrolling my lawn(s) for slow-moving worms, but the Robins are also fertilizing as they hunt.

To keep this process functioning, I don't use any harsh fertilizers on the 2 - 3 acres that I keep mowed.
 
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Old 05-16-15, 06:16 AM
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Slow moving worms? Does that mean that worms can move quickly? What is the top speed of a worm & how could it be that fast where a robin couldn't catch it?
 
  #11  
Old 05-16-15, 06:33 AM
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Originally Posted by Pulpo
". . .Slow moving worms? Does that mean that worms can move quickly? . . ."
I have studied this activity a bit . . . . and it's true that the worms cannot travel long distances at high speed; but if they're smart they leave part of their bodies inside the burrow, and if they detect the sound of an approaching Robin, they have the ability to instantaneously contract their bodies and descend back into their holes. Often, you'll see a Robin engaged in a bit of a tug-of-war witha worm who's partially inside the burrow, and partly inside the beak of the Robin (I don't know if that's the tail end or the front end) . . . . and sometimes I think they sacrifice a body part to make a clean get-away.

Originally Posted by Pulpo
" . . . What is the top speed of a worm & how could it be that fast where a robin couldn't catch it? . . ."
I have to admit that I don't have the appropriate measuring devices to come up with an accurate top speed, but if you've ever hunted for earthworms with a flashlight the night before making a major fishing expedition, you'll recall that they can be quick enough to elude many humans too.
 
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Old 05-16-15, 06:57 AM
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I think that I went fishing a few times about 50 years ago. I don't think that I looked for worms. That's about it. It's interesting though. Thanks for the info. The things that one learns here......
 
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