When to apply fungicide

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Old 06-11-15, 07:29 AM
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Question When to apply fungicide

Hi all

So, I called my local lawn place, as I had some brown patches in my lawn that showed up after I applied grub control. I first noticed them while wearing polarized sunglasses.

Lawn place said I likely had a lawn fungus. So, I picked up this Bayer Fungicide

I know there are beneficial fungus as well as the bad stuff. This is going over the whole lawn. After fertilizing, and a week of rain, the brown spots are not really noticeable with the naked eye. I do see dead patches when I walk over the lawn.

My question: I was going to apply the fungicide this am (first time in a week it isnt forecast to rain for two days). I checked the weather, and the temps are sharply up today (90 degrees) and will remain in the 80s this week. I think I read that this should be applied at lower temps/when lawn isnt stressed. Should I apply this, or just wait for a cool stretch?
 
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Old 06-11-15, 08:49 AM
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Brown patch is made worse by fertilizing and over watering. Fertilizing in summer especially with a high nitrogen fertilizer can really make the grass susceptible to brown patch.

As for the fungicide. The official word is to follow the directions on the package. Your's says to apply every 14 days if the disease is developed and every 30 days as a preventive. I've never used that product but fungus develops a resistance to many fungicides so it's often advised to switch to a different one occasionally.

Also research the ingredients in the fungicide you choose.
 
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Old 06-11-15, 10:14 AM
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How do you know its a fungus?

Its not uncommon.. summer patch after heavy rains..

http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/vi...=extensionhist
 
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Old 06-11-15, 10:16 AM
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Old 06-11-15, 11:31 AM
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I had read that thread. I'll take some pics. Based on the ones in the UNL site, I think treating the whole lawn is overkill. I'll have to see about returning the Bayer to Amazon
 
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Old 06-12-15, 01:57 PM
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SO, I cut the lawn yesterday (kid left mower too low, so hopefully I didnt damage it cutting too short).

Here are some pics of the problem areas.

The Bayer stuff says not to apply when temps are above 85, so I have to wait it seems







 
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Old 06-18-15, 07:31 AM
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Just wondering if the pics I posted below do look like what a lawn fungus would do to a lawn... thanks everyone!
 
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Old 06-18-15, 08:48 AM
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There are many types of fungus that can cause lawn problems. Your pictures could show fungus damage but there are also many other diseases, pests and things that can cause browning. The first step is to find out what type of grass you have. There are many websites that can help you identify what you have. The Scotts website has a good grass identifier. Then once you know what type of grass you have you can look more specifically at what might be causing the browning.

It could be as simple as having a blend of grasses in your lawn and one type browns in high temperatures. For example annual ryegrass is often incorporated into seed blends because it germinates fast & early and can remain green in winter but it dies back in summer and at warmer temperatures and can't stand drought. You may have a disease but it's important to know what you've got so you can treat it properly.

From the pictures I'd guess you have fescue and might have brown patch. Some of the chemicals can be quite expensive so you don't want to buy them if it's the wrong product. One of the best fungicides for brown patch I've found is Prostar but it's close to $200 a jug. There are also products containing propiconazole that work well and tend to be less expensive.
 
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Old 06-18-15, 10:56 AM
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thanks for the reply!

I know in the front, its a stress mix from local garden place, mostly fescue and some ryegrass (I have also overseeded the back with that mix)

Sounds like bringing a sample to the garden place might be a good idea
 
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Old 06-18-15, 11:20 AM
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You might just be seeing the rye dying out but telling the difference between the grasses, especially when one is dead, can be difficult. Purdue has a very detailed identifier that might help if you have the patience.
 
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