"Toadstools" (?) in lawn

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Old 07-01-15, 07:38 AM
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"Toadstools" (?) in lawn

Recently things that I've always called "Toadstools" have appeared in places on our lawn.
Is there a best way to get rid of them? (physically, chemically)
Currently, when I see one, I cut off the head/cap/top (?) and throw that away, as I had heard that they reproduce by sending seeds/spores out from that part.
As always, thanks in advance.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 07:49 AM
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The only way to get rid of mushrooms in a lawn is to let the lawn go dry, or dig up the lawn. And I doubt you want to do that. If you have a sprinkler system, maybe you can reduce the amount of water you use, or cut down the number of days you water. Watering every other day rather than EVERY day, for instance.

You can thatch your lawn to reduce the amount of humus and ground cover available.
You can pick the mushrooms as they appear to reduce the amount of new spores. But mushrooms are just the visible growth of a fungus "root system" that lives underground.

How to Eradicate Lawn Mushrooms | Home Guides | SF Gate
 
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Old 07-01-15, 08:09 AM
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Changing watering times might also help. Watering at 6 a.m., for example, will allow the Sun to reduce the humidity of the grass. Watering at midnight allows the ground to stay wet all night and nighttime is when most mushrooms regenerate, due to the darkness and high humidity.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 09:47 AM
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We have a lot of them this year too, and don't water the lawn, but have had considerable more rain this spring, so not surprising. As XSleeper said, if you water your lawn, you can diminish their potential, but, if it's from rain, just ignore them and they will go away. They're all natural, just living on whatever is already there, and thriving on just the right amount of humidity, etc., so not going to take over your lawn or anything.
 
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Old 07-01-15, 09:54 AM
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1. Just kick off the tops and wait for the decaying matter in the soil which is feeding them to completely decay
2. Dig up the decaying matter.

In an older home, you're likely dealing with tree roots. My home was built new in 2001 and the first ten years or so I would dig up a chunk of dimensional lumber which had gotten buried.
 
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Old 07-02-15, 07:17 AM
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Some feedback:
House was built approximately 1960, so it is somewhat "old", implying that the decaying material is tree roots rather than buried construction wood.
The sprinkler system is one of the old style oscillating sprayers, moved around by the old style me,
but I haven't needed to use it for the last month, due to the extra amount of rain we've had.

Back to "chopping off and throwing away".
Thanks to all for the info.
 
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