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Can a single sprinkler zone branch off in multiple directions using a tee?

Can a single sprinkler zone branch off in multiple directions using a tee?


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Old 04-20-16, 01:11 PM
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Post Can a single sprinkler zone branch off in multiple directions using a tee?

I ask because usually I see sprinkler pipes in one continuous line, which is problematic your sprinkler heads are all clustered together in a U or circle. Is there a reason why I never see a sprinkler zone that "branches off" in two directions?
 
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Old 04-20-16, 04:30 PM
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Yes, T's can be used. I tend to avoid T's and 90 degree elbows in the trunk lines because of their resistance to flow but they can be used.
 
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Old 04-20-16, 06:26 PM
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Will it reduce the pressure a lot?
 
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Old 04-21-16, 04:39 AM
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It depends on the flow through the pipe. Anytime you force the water to make a sharp 90 degree bend it hurts the flow rate by creating resistance. Basically the water heading down the pipe slams to a stop, than has to make the 90 degree turn and then be accelerated and moving again. There are online flow calculators that predict the restriction. But just for a rough idea figure that a short 90 degree elbow has the same resistance as about 2 1/2 feet of pipe.
 
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Old 04-21-16, 11:55 AM
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I am thinking that if you split the flow of water in two directions, the pressure going to the heads connected to each side is halved, no?
 
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Old 04-21-16, 05:20 PM
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No, splitting the flow with a T does not half the pressureto each side coming off it.

More important than a particular fitting (Tee or 90) is to properly size your zone. You don't want too many emitters or to use emitters that flow too much water. If you try to spray more water than your piping can provide the pressure will drop and the further you go from the source the more the pressure will drop.

Using a T can actually work in your favor sometimes. If you have 10 emitters in one zone all in a straight line and feed it from one end the first emitter gets full pressure and the next down the line gets a little bit less. By the time the water gets to the end the last emitter has had 9 emitters before it stealing it's flow. But if you fed the water supply into the middle of the string with a T then then the furthest emitter only has 4 others in front of it so while the fitting does steal a little pressure it insures a more even flow throughout the zone.
 
 

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