What does startup irrigation for spring involve?

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Old 04-12-19, 11:37 AM
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What does startup irrigation for spring involve?

Do I need to pay landscape service to come over and startup my irrigation system for spring? In the fall, they did come over and blow out the pipe on the irrigation system; however, I'm just wasn't sure how involved starting up an irrigation system that I need to pay for a professional to come over and do it for me.
 
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Old 04-12-19, 11:44 AM
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Assume you have a back-flow presenter valve, there is usually a small drain cap that needs to be put back on.

The same valve usually has two ports/valves on the side that were used for blowing out the lines that need to be closed.

After that, plug in your controller, open the main valve and cross fingers that nothing froze and burst during the winter!
 
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Old 04-12-19, 01:36 PM
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For me it means turning the water on to my irrigation system (I have a shutoff valve inside the house that I turn off in winter). Then I turn my irrigation controller on. Then I manually turn each zone and go outside and inspect each sprinkler. I'm looking for and pop-ups that are leaking, the spray pattern and just generally make sure everything looks good.
 
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Old 04-15-19, 06:06 AM
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Thank you for all the responses.
 
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Old 04-17-19, 07:52 AM
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If it was me....I would have the company (or other irrigation service) come over and do the start up. Watch closely and make notes. I don't do this in OR to the degree that is done in WI,..... but if you want to blow out your system next fall, be careful, as too great psi can damage your valves in the boxes. Plus if anything is broken....they are there to fix.
 
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Old 04-25-19, 06:00 AM
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This is the type of back-flow I have. I don't see a way to turn the lever/handle to on and off like many of the Youtube videos I've seen. Any suggestions? Thanks!

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Old 04-25-19, 12:05 PM
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Manual shutoff valves have a lever that you can open and close and you do not have one in your photo. Your main valve is controlled electrically by the system's controller. You can also manually activate it by the small black lever labeled "on/off". You can usually also turn it on by partially unscrewing the solenoid (the black thing with wire coming out). If you don't have water at the equipment shown in your photo you need to follow the piping further upstream and look for a manual shutoff valve.
 
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Old 04-26-19, 04:24 AM
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Thanks Pilot. So, how do the irrigation system service provider turn on a valve that is controlled electrically by the system's controller? Do they turn it on via the controller box? If so, I have access to it. The box is in my garage. I just wasn't sure what to do in the controller box yet.

Or do they also just manually turn like you described?
 
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Old 04-26-19, 04:40 AM
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Any professional will need access to your controller. Since the system is already set up all that's usually involved is turning the controller on. When it is time to irrigate the controller turns on the master valve and then each zone as needed.

Manually turning on the valve is usually only done when testing something or just trying to get it work if say the wire between it and the controller is broken. My system does not have a master valve but my controller has the output for it.
 
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Old 04-26-19, 07:55 AM
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Okay, so that sounds like my system is much easier to startup in spring then. I assumed all I have to do is turn on the controller and go through all the zones to test all the sprinklers and that's it, correct?

So the steps are:
  1. Go to the controller and turn it on
  2. Then in my basement where we divert water to the irrigation system, turn the handle to on.
  3. Test all the zones/sprinklers
  4. Set water schedules on the controller

Let me know if I missed any steps. Thanks a bunch!
 
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Old 04-26-19, 09:21 AM
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Starting up in the spring really is pretty simple. It's a job I often do with an adult beverage in one hand. There isn't a lot of pre-inspection or preparation as it's so easy to just turn it all on and see what doesn't work or is leaking. Fall and closing the system down for the season is when you have to be more careful to get all the water out of the system to prevent freeze damage.
 
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Old 04-27-19, 09:27 AM
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This is the controller that I have.
https://www.toro.com/en/professional...olution-series
 
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