New Lawn challenges

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  #1  
Old 07-20-19, 09:32 AM
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New Lawn challenges

I have seeded new lawn little over a month ago. I knew it's late but this was due to other projects I had to complete first in my backyard.
Anyhow.... I used Jonathan Green Black Beauty seeds and was watering area at least daily.... Seemed everything was going well but now I see some problems that I'd need help with:
1. There seems to be a lot of dead grass under the healthy grass...I tried to show it in the pictures but it's rather difficult ....Is it possible I put too much seed and some grass just got suffocated ?
2. As you can see the growth and quality is not uniform.... there seem to be spots and dead or different color (yellowing) of the grass...any ideas what can cause it ? Maybe I have watered it too much ??
3. From time to time I see an actual mushroom or few growing.... are there products I could use ? Is it indication of some problem ? I have no mushrooms growing anywhere near me (front yard or even neighbors) ....so not sure where they came from.

Thank you!

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  #2  
Old 07-20-19, 10:00 AM
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Start by telling us where you are located. Hopefully somewhere in Canada or Alaska.

Instructions for posting pictures are in a sticky at the top of every forum section.
 
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Old 07-20-19, 10:01 AM
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Your over thinking this, it takes about 3 years for a newly seeded lawn to fill in, some areas got a lot of seeds, some less, you cant "suffocate" nature/

Just keep it watered, probably time to put down some starter fertilizer, and mushrooms just grow off decaying material , they are nothing to worry about!
 
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Old 07-20-19, 11:23 AM
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Their profile says they're from New Jersey. Pics are there. Do you not see them?
 
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Old 07-20-19, 11:34 AM
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Shadeladie, This is an example of a post with pictures not loading properly, like i was mentioning to the mods earlier. I have to hit reload several times for the to show up, or click on open in new tab to get them to show.

To the op, it just looks to me like you need to rake or thatch the lawn. It will fill 8n if you keep watering it, and keep applying weed and feed as needed once it's established. As mentioned, a perfect lawn doesn't happen overnight, or even in one season.
 
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Old 07-20-19, 11:37 AM
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Okay, but they seem to be okay now.

ETA: Okay on and off.
 
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Old 07-20-19, 11:39 AM
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True... but I had to reload the page 3x to get them.
 
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Old 07-20-19, 11:42 AM
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Yeah, edited my reply! .......
 
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Old 07-20-19, 04:42 PM
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Definitely too soon to tell so I don't see anything to worry about. But I would not rake or thatch it at this point because there are undoubtedly still a lot of tender sprouts in the mix and you don't want to yank them out before they even have a chance to sprout.
 
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Old 07-21-19, 04:53 AM
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I still haven't been able to get the pictures to load.
 
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Old 07-21-19, 07:42 AM
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Thanks guys for the feedback....I just assume that the new grass would grow pretty uniform... didn't know that it's normal to see some spots and discoloration.

Should I still water the lawn daily ? At what point would that be too much and risking over-saturation / water damage ??
It's been over a month and where grass is healthy it's pretty big....and I already cut it before as it was well over 5 inches in length
 
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Old 07-21-19, 10:18 AM
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That explains all the smothered areas with clumps of dry grass.
 
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Old 07-21-19, 11:02 AM
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We're all busy with all sorts of other things so I normally wouldn't say anything, but since it's a bit more of a priority for you this year I suggest more frequent mowings so that you're not taking off as much at one time. Too short is not good, but neither is too tall, and, in my opinion, 5" is too tall, particularly with new growth. I'm not the best to comment on watering because I try to seed when spring rains and heavier dew are likely, and tend to leave it to mother nature. But since you are watering, I would take out few small plugs and see if it's moist to the bottoms of the roots. If it is, you're good, and might try alternating days. My first thought though when you mentioned mushrooms is that maybe you're watering a little heavier than you need to. Did you put straw down? I'm a big believer in it, but don't see any remnants.
 
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Old 07-21-19, 12:46 PM
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Keeping Fescue growing and healthy during this hottest part of the year is a delicate balance. Frequent, deep waterings will help it tolerate the heat. You can also use watering to cool the grass and promote growth but the gotcha is "brown spot" and other diseases. Brown spot in particular flourishes in hot weather and when the grass is actively growing.

Fescue generally goes dormant when it gets hot and forms a hard outer shell to retain moisture. This hard shell resists diseases like brown spot. If you force the grass to grow with fertilizer or water during the hottest months you have fresh, tender new juicy grass which is more suseptible to diseases like brown spot. You can counter the problem somewhat with fungicides but you're fighting Mother Nature and she tends to be more persistent...

Basically it's a bad time of year in most of the US for growing Fescue. Just be glad you have any of it surviving.
 
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Old 08-04-19, 07:45 AM
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So first of all - THANK YOU all for the comments - surely helps manage my expectation since it's my first property and first time seeding a new lawn.

Few additional questions as follow ups to the above points:
1. How long should I wait before applying any selective herbicides and if it depends on the type of chemistry - if there anything OK to apply after just a few months of steady growth of the new grass ?
2. What is a safe distance from small trees, flower beds etc.... to use Glyphosate.... I have around the house mulch with occasional plant ....I wonder how much I can spray things like Roundup to prevent any growth from the mulch ? (I can take pics to show the layout)
3. IF the weeds are overgrowing the new grass.....should I just wait until late Fall, and only then start treatments and fertilize the grass or is there anything I can do now ?? (Again I can take picture but for now it looks like mostly weeds and barely any new grass).

Thank you !!
 
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Old 08-04-19, 09:29 AM
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1. How long you need to wait depends mostly on the chemical you want to apply. The instructions will tell you how long to wait. It's common to have to wait until after 2 or 6 mowings.

2. Glyphosate must be sprayed on to the green leaves of a growing plant. You don't need to stay away from plants any specific distance. Just don't spray stuff you want to kill. Be very mindful of the wind and the very fine overspray. Everyone pays attention to the main spray stream but you also need to be mindful of where the really fine mist is going.

3. First you need to determine roughly what weeds you have. If they are broadleaf weeds they are easily controlled with 2,4-D or similar. If you have crabgrass or some other foreign grasses then you need to be more picky about the herbicide. Whatever you choose you have to be careful applying during the really hot, dry part of summer as the grass you want is already stressed by the weather making it more easily harmed by herbicides.
 
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Old 08-05-19, 05:34 PM
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Wow....I thought the damage to the weeds from Glyphosate is coming from both - damaging the leaves and the roots..... (I think I recall the claims on the bottles - "kills to the roots" )
I have sprayed it many times on the sidewalks and the mulch beds - thinking I am doing long term prevention / inhibition of any weeds and grasses coming up.
I guess it was all a waste.... weird how they make residual claims.....

Thanks !!
 
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Old 08-06-19, 04:27 AM
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"Kills the roots" is not a residual claim. Glyphosate does kill the roots. The plant absorbs it through the leaves then it gets transported throughout the entire plant, killing it from top to bottom.

If you do buy a herbicide with residual affect be careful with it's use especially on walkways and other hard surfaces as most products don't bind with the soil and can be transported away with rain. One heavy thunderstorm and a week later you can have dead streaks in your lawn from the herbicide washed to where you don't want it.
 
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Old 08-06-19, 05:37 PM
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So to continue.....

I did 3 big sections - pictures in order (front, back, side)
1. the front was done way back....over a year ago - there was this large circular area I repaired and as you can see, it's a mix of older, well established grass and a decent amount of weeds
2. The back of the house I did late Spring of this year... seems it's growing and not too many weeds but some patches and burned grass
3. Finally - the side of the house - which I did last.... about 3 months ago....was a struggle considering hot Summer here in NJ..... barely any grass, mostly weeds...though when I look up close I see some young grass coming up

My intention is to use Bayer Acclaim for the front and spray the entire area....I believe grass is well established by now and there is so much weeds that spot treatment won't work.

For the rear I will do spot treatment and later in a few months give it some fertilizer....maybe also some antifungal.... .This is because the lawn is still young and the weeds are just in some spots but also want to use the fertilizer to restore some of the brown spots.

Finally for the side - I think the battle is over. I can't help it.....will nuke it with a mix of various herbicides knowing that I will probably kill the grass and then re-seed fresh in Fall

Would you agree or recommend different approach ?

Thank you !!
 
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Old 08-07-19, 01:51 AM
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Personally I see no reason to use a seperate application of weed killer.

Newer lawns benefit from multiple applications of a good weed and feed fertilizer.

When my lawn was new, I did 4 applications per year, today 1 with spot treatments of week killer!

You really want to get away from herbicides and get the grass thickened up to naturally control the weeds.



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  #21  
Old 08-07-19, 05:05 AM
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I'm a fan of overseeding regularly. In your case every year until you get the lawn more established. You can go over the lawn with a pulverizer, plug aerator or a thorough dethtatching then broadcast the seed. I would do it in late summer or early fall when daytime highs are reliably in the low 80s or less. This will allow the grass to germinate and sink some decent roots before winter. Then come spring it should really take off, especially in the bare patches.
 
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