Tackling Weeds in Newly Seeded Lawn

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Old 05-01-20, 10:51 AM
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Tackling Weeds in Newly Seeded Lawn

About a month ago I cleared, leveled, top soiled and seeded an overgrown, wooded area on my property that was rampant with weeds. I knew that my summer was going to be a battle between me and the weeds. The area (50x60 ft or so) was seeded (Scotts Sun and Shade mix wit the blue fertilizer coating) and topped with hay mulch. Three weeks after seeding, I spread Lesco Starter 18-24-12 fertilizer. Also, last week, I said what the hell and threw down some lesco sun and shade mix seed that I had. Now, about five weeks since we first seeded, I can see the grass is germinating pretty well (maybe an inch or so). However, so are the weeds. I figured I need to let the grass grow in more before I start walking through and tackling the weeds.

Its unclear what type of weeds they are at this point in time but none of them are flowering, at least. Any advice on how to tackle them? Its not a big area, so I figure I could spot spray them once I can walk on the grass? I am new to lawn care so I am also not sure what I can do for the weeds without hurting the growing grass. Is there something I should do now or wait for the grass to be more established?

I am located on the shoreline in CT.

thanks.
 
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Old 05-01-20, 11:19 AM
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I would not worry too much about the weeds while the grass is new. Most of those weeds will not be going to seed before you give the lawn its first mowing. If you have especially big or obnoxious weeds, I would just go around and yank them once its established well enough to walk on... Often it's the hay that is to blame for bringing in some of those weeds.

As far as treating the lawn with any chemicals goes, that will vary depending on what you are going to use. But generally you dont want to apply ANY chemical to a new lawn until it is well established and it has grown enough that you have mowed it 4 or 5x.

Since you have seeded several times, that throws your timeline off. The newest grass will be harmed by any chemicals if you spray too soon.
 
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Old 06-08-20, 04:14 PM
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Alright, So I am nearing the time where I can begin spraying some of the weeds I am battling. Of biggest concern is that large up-cropping of clover throughout the established lawn.

I have Lesco Momentum-4 score, however, I am a little hesitant to use it since I have a dog at home and my understanding it the 2,4-d is pretty bad stuff. Alternatively, I was thinking of getting some mesotrione (either Tenacity or Meso 4-c), I think these two are more pet/human friendly and newly seeded turf friendly. They are pricier than momentum but still not terrible (~$60), especially since my lawn is very small.

Any experience with these herbicides or other recommendations?
 
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Old 06-08-20, 05:35 PM
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Any yard that I have started from seed I never worried a bout weeds until the following year. They are easy to control and right now you want to just fertilize and get the grass nice and strong.

Dont risk damaging the new grass just for some minor weeds!
 
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Old 06-09-20, 06:25 AM
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Did you kill everything before starting this new grass project? If you just cleared the area and then planted you could be in for a lot of weeds.
 
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Old 06-09-20, 07:17 AM
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Next time around use straw rather than hay to cover newly seeded area. Fewer weeds to fight.
 
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Old 06-09-20, 09:44 AM
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use straw rather than hay
Yea, I missed that part, that's like having a free beer sign, your going to get more than you every thought.

Only thing good is that many wont last over the winter!
 
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Old 06-09-20, 09:54 AM
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The weeds in the "new" area surprisingly aren't too bad. The "new" area of the yard was separated from the yard originally. I couldn't for the life of me figure out why the previous owner did this but I learned last week she bought 20ft of the adjacent lot but never got around to moving her shed and gardens to open the yard up to it. The "new" area was part grass and part overgrown, insane waist-high weeds last summer. There was also a huge evergreen that needed to come down after storm damage.

We took all that out last November and turned the shed 90degrees and pushed it back. In February we tilled, brought in about 3-4 yards of topsoil to level, and seeded. The day after that seeding, we had heavy down pours that really compacted the soil. After seeds germinated for a couple of weeks, I could still see patches where they struggled to break through so I loosened the soil with a garden weasel and reseeded. I was also unhappy with the established lawn ( i failed to treat it last fall), so I over seeded and then patch seeded where the dog went to town on it (I really have come to like the scotts patch master).

Since all of this, and now with consistent warm weather, the lawn is looking pretty full. The weeds in the new area are manageable by hand pulling, however, there are a lot of clovers coming up in the established lawn that I'm not thrilled about. The clovers are probably what I will try to spot spray, if anything, this season. The big question is, kill the clovers or let them be? You can see a couple of the patches of clover in the last picture. There are probably 2-3 more patches out further in the yard.





 
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Old 06-09-20, 10:07 AM
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Yeah, the first batch of seeding, I am not sure but I might have used hay. The second area of the lawn I seeded I used straw. At least so far, I dont think I am being punished for that first mistake.

To answer Pilot Dane, we did not kill off the area, however, it was pretty empty of weeds thanks to the winter. I think in that area we will be able to tackle any residual weeds that might crop up since it isnt too big. Luckily, the wife gets on a conference call for work and just walks through pulling the little weeds up as the appear. Its quite effective.
 
 

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