Landscape Timber


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Old 03-27-21, 04:47 PM
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Landscape Timber

I am using Landscape Timber around fake grass. Is there a way of treating PRESSURE TREATED LANDSCAPE TIMBER SO IT WILL LAST A FEW YEARS? I just put it down three years ago and now I have to replace it. One big box store said to use UV protection on the timbers. Any ideas
 
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Old 03-28-21, 03:41 AM
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Most of the ones I've used on the ground like that lasted 10-15 yrs. A deck stain might help a little. You might be better off using PT 4x4s instead, If I understand correctly they are treated better than the landscape timbers.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 03:56 AM
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I am sort of stuck with this size. I installed them before have the fake grass installed and do not want to disturb the grass edges. These I can just pull out and install newer ones. I just used the timber as a border when the grass was installed.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 04:59 AM
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2"x lumber is NOT treated for ground contact. So, if you use 2x4, 2x6 or 2x8... they will not last when used as landscape edging. You can special order 2"x lumber treated for ground contact and it's more commonly available in coastal areas. The only wood you can just pick up at a home center that will have a chance of lasting is a timber like 4x4, 4x6 or 6x6. You could also consider using synthetic decking for your edging. It will be more expensive and won't have structural strength like wood but I'm guessing it would be OK for edging.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 05:56 AM
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Bill, are you using dimensional lumber [2xs] or landscape timbers which are typically 3"x5"?
 
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Old 03-28-21, 06:10 AM
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Check the labels to make sure what you choose is treated for ground contact. Not all landscape timbers are rated for ground contact.
 
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Old 03-28-21, 07:27 AM
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I've had great luck with copper napthenate as a preservative. Much of the deterioration of ground timbers occur due to water soaking in cracks, and the end grain. Here's the process I use:
- stand the new timbers straight up on their ends. Coat the end grains on the top with the napthenate until the wood won't accept any more.
- apply the napthenate to the rest of the wood, minus the lower end grain, while it is still standing up.
- wait a day, flip the timber, and repeat
When you install the timber, pre-drill any screw/stake holes. Pour the napthenate in the holes.
Be sure to get a napthenate that is intended for ground use.
 
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Old 03-29-21, 02:01 PM
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The landscape timber is 3X4. If I find 3X5 I would use that. An example from HD--Internet #301802514-Model #288731-Store SKU #129430 or lowes -Item #4574Model #LSTP. I do not find it saying ground contact. But because of the size, I am stuck with 3X4 or if I can find 3X5(have not seen this size here in NYC).
I would try the copper naphthenate If I can. If I used the copper naphthenate on the landscape timber does it have to be dried or like sometimes it is still wet?
 
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Old 03-29-21, 03:52 PM
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Of course the drier the timber, the better it will soak the oil.
If the timber is still wet then applying to the end grain and any cracks is all that you need to do.
If you are going to drive stakes or screws through the timbers, be sure to pre-drill the holes and treat with the napthenate or oil based sealant. Seal the cracks and end grains and the timbers will last a long time.
You can also re-coat every few years if the wood starts to look dry.
 
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Old 03-29-21, 08:28 PM
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Thanks for the help.Thanks for the help.
 
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Old 04-04-21, 10:14 AM
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I went to both big box stores and this is what I found. In one landscape timber is treated this way--Treated to Refusal — indicates that the wood was treated under specific conditions until it refused additional preservative, a point usually below the requirements of industry standards. The result is wood that cannot be relied upon to last as long as wood that meets standards.----the other box store landscape timber is treated this way--UFP Treated means that the wood is pressure treated with chromated copper arsenate (CCA) to make it less susceptible to rot. This technique comes from building boats, piers, carports,... anything that is exposed to the elements and has been around for quite some time.
I guess I brought at the first box store.
 
 

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