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Areas of dead grass getting larger even in areas of new grass from 2 years ago

Areas of dead grass getting larger even in areas of new grass from 2 years ago


  #1  
Old 10-11-23, 08:54 AM
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Areas of dead grass getting larger even in areas of new grass from 2 years ago

Attached are pics of problem areas of dead grass. The pics were taken early AM with dew on the grass so they look better than they normally do when the grass is dry so take that into consideration.

I've had problems earlier this year, that I fixed those by removing the dead grass using a 'Garden Weasel' to tear up the old grass. I broke up the soil further with that tool (works great, best investment I've made), spread the seed and covered it with fresh top soil (which I've done before in previous years).

But, after most of the patches I fixed grew back in, these two appeared and got worse. If you notice in a couple of pics there is a distinct line where the grass I planted 2 years ago and the dead portion is.

I looked for bugs, but didn't see any. Grubs I believe they are called that can cause this. I didn't see any a couple of months ago either. Any idea what is going on??













Oh, that dark area is freshly planted grass.
 
  #2  
Old 10-11-23, 09:46 AM
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Walk the area and feel the ground for softness from underground tunnels, possibly from voles or moles. Also use a shovel to dig a test area and look for grubs. Because you didn't see them months ago doesn't mean they aren't a problem now. If it's not that you may have something in the soil, possibly a fungus or some other disease.
 
  #3  
Old 10-11-23, 09:54 AM
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Dig how far deep?
I did look for insects months ago and when I took those pics, but only on the surface.
 
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Old 10-11-23, 11:55 AM
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You can search for other instructions but here is one I found.
 
videobruce voted this post useful.
  #5  
Old 10-11-23, 12:30 PM
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When I and my landscaping guy looked for these neither found any. I wasn't sure what they look like, but that pic made it clear there is no way I would of missed seeing them.
The ground is solid, almost like a rock. No soft spots. No areas of grass that pulled up easy, were all rooted. I do have a very soft grass, they called it 'bent' grass and it does have a root system like vines where it seems to grow horizontally as opposed to individual blades of grass with their own root.
(Sorry for the lack of proper terms.) Then my guess is fungus of some kind.
 
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Old 10-12-23, 11:19 AM
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I cut out a 1x1 ft square of the dead grass. I cut down probably 4-5". I flipped it over exposing the bottom of the cut.
I then using a hand fork dug out all the good dirt down to the root structure.
There were no grubs or anything else other than 4 worms.

Can I assume it's a fungus?

There is another patch that is the newest, I didn't want to dig that up due to it's location further away. The one dug up is in the area that has been bad for 2 months plus.





The dug out piece is on the right, the resulting hole is on the left. This was in the area I showed in the other pics.
 
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Old 10-12-23, 11:50 AM
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Yea, that dirt & roots look nice and clean.

You can take a sample to your local agricultural extension office and have them look at is and see if they can identify. They may want a small square of soil with roots and part should be dead/dying and the other living. The transition area is important. I had a similar, tough problem and my ag extension couldn't identify the culprit so they sent my sample to the state's lab for analysis, no charge. If you have any sod farms or fertilizer/feed stores (not big box, you want where the farmers go) or a knowledgeable lawn care professional (not just a lawn mower) and see if anyone there can identify the problem.
 
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Old 10-12-23, 01:57 PM
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I'll see if I can get ahold of Cornell U. in NYS. I believe I used them 20 or so years ago for soil analysis.

I have talked to the landscaper that I have a contract with about the problem, he said he will come over and apply something for fungus and a fertilizer mix. I have sent him the pics I posted here for reference.
 
 

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