12v patio lighting without using 120 AC adapter


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Old 02-12-24, 08:31 PM
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12v patio lighting without using 120 AC adapter

I'm adding 12v patio lights to a transformer I already have. The lights I ordered say you can remove the 110 to 12v transformer and wire directly.

The picture below shows what it looks like without the 110 ac transformer connected. It it as simple as cutting the wires and spliciing directly to the landscape low voltage wiring I already have?

Thanks



 
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Old 02-12-24, 08:34 PM
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It may be just as easy.... based on the output of the power supply.
What output voltage does it say and AC or DC ?
 
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Old 02-13-24, 03:29 AM
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It is not clear to me what you are trying to do but don't connect 120 vac to low voltage wire. Not allowed by fire code.
 
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Old 02-13-24, 05:56 AM
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Those connectors are for low voltage connections. Not 120VAC. I would re-read your instructions. I know of no LED that can operate without some sort of power supply to convert to low voltage DC.
 
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Old 02-13-24, 12:31 PM
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Re-read his question.
He's asking if his existing low voltage lighting circuit can be used in place of the supplied wall wart.
 
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Old 02-13-24, 03:20 PM
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PJmax is correct. You can use another transformer to replace the wall wort as long as you mind the AC/DC. Some lighting transformers lower the voltage to 12v but leave the current alternating. Most (but not all) wall worts these days output in DC. I have several several strips of LED's NOT using their original power supply. It works quite well.

If your power supply and wall wort are AC then you don't need to worry about polarity. You can't hook the two wires up backwards. If your power supply is DC then you do need to make sure you match positive to positive and negative to negative.
 
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Old 02-19-24, 03:32 PM
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Low voltage patio lighting

I bought these lights because they were advertised as either 120v or 12v. I'd like to hook these to my smart landscape 12v transformer so I can control them with the rest of the patio and landscape lighting.

Should I just cut the connector off and connect it to the transformer with the same 12 gauge low voltage wiring I use for the other lights?

Thanks!

 
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Old 02-19-24, 03:40 PM
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Threads combined. Original thread posted last week.
 
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Old 02-20-24, 04:13 AM
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I would just use the transformer (TF1)that came with the LEDs to power the LEDs. To use another transformer (TF2), it should be verified the LEDs power requirements can be supplied by TF2's unused capacity or something can be destroyed if not fused correctly.
 
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Old 02-23-24, 02:10 PM
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Looks like I'm out of luck --one is DC and one is AC.

 
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Old 02-23-24, 03:15 PM
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Correct..... unfortunately your lights require DC. You'll need to use the supplied transformer.
 
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Old 02-27-24, 10:25 AM
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Ok, now I realize I have a bigger problem. I have a 12V DC bilge blower that I was planning on hooking up with that same transformer. (The bilge blower is there to blow air in a 3" pipe buried under the patio and up into the firepit.)

I (sort of) understand that transformers will only change the voltage, not from DC to AC or vice versa. Is there anything that can put out 12V DC so I can run the low-voltage wiring instead of running conduit for the 110 AC?

In short, I'd like to use the existing "smart" transformer for the landscaping lighting and something separate for 12V DC to the patio lights in the original post and the bilge blower.

Thanks again
 
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Old 02-27-24, 10:58 AM
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"Is there anything that can put out 12V DC..."
Yes, it's a power supply. Small ones are often wall warts while bigger ones are stand alone boxes much like the transformer for your landscape lighting. You will need one with sufficient output for everything you want to power. I like to keep the load to a max of 75% of capacity, but that's just my personal desire to not push something to 100% which might shorten it's life.

Since you are will be working with low voltage keep in mind that DC doesn't travel long distance very well (voltage loss). You will need to properly size your wires for the current they are carrying and the distance.
 
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Old 02-27-24, 02:27 PM
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Figure 1A for the lights.
How many amps does the blower require..... probably 2-3 amps ?

The type power supply used depends on location and current needed.
A 12vdc @ 5A supply would probably be plenty but the supply needs to be kept dry,.
One example of a power supply.
 
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Old 02-27-24, 06:53 PM
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Ok. Awesome. So I just need to find a weatherproof case (LIKE THIS?) and mount the 12V DC power supply inside. Do I need to worry about the power supply overheating in the weatherproof box? Alternatively, I could mount the power supply in the basement and run the low-voltage wiring out at ground level easily enough. That should ensure the moisture/overheating isn't an issue.

If I think the max draw is 3-4 AMPs is there any downside to getting a power supply that puts out 10A? I figure that will leave room to add lights if I feel so moved. Would that also help with the voltage loss?

This is the 12/2 wiring I'm using. The run will be about 45-50'.

Thanks again!
 
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Old 02-28-24, 05:06 AM
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Getting a larger than needed power supply is not a problem.

A larger power supply will not affect power loss since that (voltage drop) is caused by the wiring. The only way around that is to keep the wiring as short as possible and properly size the wires. There are online calculators where you can plug in the wire length and your amperage draw to see how much you will loose. Generally heavier wire (smaller gauge number) is better. But with 12ga wire you are good. That size wire will leave plenty of extra available if you decide to add more lighting in the future.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 11:48 AM
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Another option that seems like it would work:

Could I use my existing Transformer (which puts out 12V AC) and install this 12V AC to 12V DC on one of the "zones." Then the 12V DC lights and blower can run off them, which the rest of the zones put out 12V AC to the other landscape lighting.

That would let me still control all the appliances with one transformer / app.

Thanks again.
 
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Old 02-28-24, 12:52 PM
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Yes, that should work as long as your existing transformer can supply enough wattage for everything.
 
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